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The Third Int'l Conference
of King Abdulaziz University
Faculty of Dentistry
About
Chairman's Message

My dear colleagues: a warm welcome to the Third Conference of the Faculty of Dentistry at King AbdulAziz University, which will be held under the kind patronage of His Royal Highness Prince Khalid Al-Faisal, Prince of Makkah Region, and that will be held at the Hilton Hotel from the 18-21/4/1433H corresponding to the 12-15/3/2012G.

This great event will furthermore commemorate the passing of 25 years since the birth of our dear Faculty.

By holding these national and International scientific conferences and events, the faculty of dentistry at King Abdulaziz University aims to enrich the field of dentistry in the kingdom by introducing new advances in the field of research and treatment and by presenting the latest technologies that will help all those working in this field to advance their knowledge in the above-mentioned aspects. Another goal set forth by these events, is the exchange of knowledge and experience by inviting exemplary and well known speakers from outside and within the Kingdom. The Organizing Committee has exerted great effort to bring together an elite group of speakers from America, Europe, Arab and Gulf Countries, as well as exceptional sons from within the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

The Conference will offer several workshops that present and explain new technologies and techniques in various branches of Dentistry, and will also hold a high caliber Exhibition to display the latest International technologies in materials and equipment as presented by the local companies that represent hundreds of International Companies.

The conference will also be the venue for a meeting among the various Deans of the many Dental Faculties in the country to discuss many important issues pertaining to the advancements of the Dental Profession in the Kingdom, and to this regard, will be accompanied by a number of social events that will be held in conjunction with the conference.

I have to express my sincerest gratitude to the Minister of Higher Education and the Higher Administration of King Abdulaziz University, above all, his Excellency the Rector of King Abdulaziz University, for their encouragement and support. I also thank the Organizing Committee, with participants from within and outside the Faculty, for their efforts in ensuring the success of this conference and for their dedication in ensuring that we carry out our endeavors in a manner that is exemplary and that will see to the fulfillment of our ambitious goals.

On behalf of the Organizing Committee I would like to welcome you all to this great event.

Dr. AbdulGhani I. Mira,
Dean, Faculty of Dentistry
Conference Chairman
Organizing committees
The 3dr International Conference of King Abdulaziz University Faculty of Dentistry

1-Organizing Committee:

Dean Conference Chairman
Vice Dean for Postgraduate & Scientific Research Co-Chairman & Conference Coordinator
Vice Dean for Academic Affairs member
Vice Dean for Female member
Vice Dean for Clinical Affairs member
Chairman of Oral Basic & Clinical Sciences member
Chairman of Oral & Maxillofacial Rehabilitation member
Chairman of Preventive Dental Sciences member
Director Supervisor of the Media Center member
Supervisor General of Public Relation member
Dr. Yaser Mohammad Alkhiary member
Dr. Fahad Hassan Banasr member

2- Scientific Committee:

Dr. Mohammad Salim Al Zahrani Head of Committee
Prof. Ali Habib Hassan member
Prof. Jamila Mohamed Ali Farsi member
Prof. Hany Shams Eldin Salama member
Prof. Soad Mahmoud Ali Mansour member
Prof. Madiha Mahmoud Gomaa member
Dr. Ahmed Omar Al Yamani member
Dr. Abdullah Saeed Ali Al Mushayt member
Dr. Dania Ebrahim Al Agili member

3- Continuing Education Committee:

Dr. Mohammed Khalil Yousef Head of Committee
Prof. Mohammed Mustafa Kamal Shehata member
Prof. Ragab Eid Saif Hassan member
Prof. Fahmy Abdel Aal Hassanein member
Prof Magda Kamal Marie member

4- Registration Committee:

Dr. Yaser Mohammad Alkhiary Head of Committee
Dr. Salma Ahmed Bahannan member
Dr. Shoroog Hassan Ibrahim Agou member
Dr. Rayyan Abdulhamid Kayal member
Dr. Kalid Alitha Al-Johani member

5- Accommodation Committee:

Dr. Fahad Hassan Banasr Head of Committee
Dr. Hany Ahmed Niazy member
Dr. Mohamd Tharwat Hamed member
Prof. Khalid Abdullah Balto member
Dr. Laila Ahmed Bahmam member
Dr. Osama Shujaa Alotumani member

6- Media Committee:

Director Supervisor of the Media Center Head of Committee
Prof. Abdulhamaid Abdullah Maghrabi member
Dr. Khalid Hashim Zawawi member
Dr. Abeer Moh Al Nowaiser member
Mr. Saleh Faiz Al-Husaiki member

7- Public Relation Committee:

Supervisor General of Public Relation Head of Committee
Dr. Zuhair Ameen Murshid member
Dr. Fahad Faiz Al-Sulaimani member
Dr. Helal Mohammed Sunbul member

8- Female Committee:

Sumer Madani Alaki Head of Committee
Prof. Rabab Mohamed Fetieh member
Prof. Najlaa Mohamed Alamoudi member
Prof. Najat Mohammed Ali Farsi member
Dr. Fadia Mohammad Al-Hummayani member
Dr. Safia Ali Al-Attas member
Dr. Abeer Abdulaziz Mukeem member
Dr. Maisa Osama Al-Sebaei member
Dr. Lulwa Ebrahim AL-Turki member
Dr. Dalia Abdullah Abualenain member
Dr. Amna Yusuf Siddiqui member

9- Printing Committee:

Dr. Thamer Yousif Marghalani Head of Committee
Dr. Emad Ahmed Awad member
Dr. Zuhair Talal Bakhsh member
Dr. Dina Ahmed AL-Tayeb member
Dr. Sahar Mohammedd Noor Bukhary member
Prof. Hana Mohammed Jamjoum member

10- Exhibition Committee:

Dr. Motaz Ahmed Ghulman Head of Committee
Prof. Ahmed Zaki member
Dr. Ayman Abdulaziz Al-Darab member
Dr. Khaled Abdulaziz Merdad member
Mr. Mohammed Wahedy AL-Zahrany member

11- Opening & Closing Ceremony Committee:

Dr. Mamdouh Mohammed Karima Head of Committee
Prof. Hisham Ibrahim Othman member
Dr. Aiman Othman Johar member
Dr. Tariq Saad Abuhaimed member
Dr. Ziyad Tariq Al Zamzami member
About Conference

The 3rd International Conference of King Abdulaziz Faculty of Dentistry is a multidisciplinary event aiming to introduce the most recent advances in the field of dentistry and related research.

Twenty one well known international and local invited speakers in addition to 18 contributed speakers will enrich the scientific program of the conference. Ninety five posters will be presented in two poster sessions.

The conference will offer 4 continuing education seminars and 2 workshops. The exhibition will have 30 companies representing more than 150 international agencies.

News
Programs
Speakers
Events
About Jeddah
Exhibitions
Booth No.
1
180m2
Strategic Sponsor
Booth No.
2
150m2
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3
150m2
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60m2
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40m2
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110m2
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28m2
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40m2
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9
12m2
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15
28m2
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14
28m2
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12
16m2
Booth No.
11
24m2
Booth No.
17
28m2
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10
12m2
Booth No.
18
28m2
Booth No.
16
12m2
Booth No.
13, 22
24m2
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20m2
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24
9m2
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36m2
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9m2
Booth No.
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9m2
Booth No.
30
9m2

 

 

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The Third Int'l Conference
of King Abdulaziz University
Faculty of Dentistry
Phone: +966 2 6401000 Ext. 21206

WebSite: http://fdc.kau.edu.sa
Social Networks
Jeddah Hilton Map
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Maps
VIP Guests Events
2012
March 12
20:30 - 23:00
2012
March 13
20:30 - 23:30
2012
March 14
20:30 - 23:30
Ladies Events
Monday 12/3/2012
6-8 PM Shopping night
A visit to "Al-Balad" and "Red Sea Mall".
Tuesday 13/3/20122
6-8 PM Coffee Gathering
Coffee gathering at "ElBelagio" in Cornish. The event is aimed at giving the group a chance to socialize and enjoy Jeddah atmosphere.
Alumni Events

KAUFD alumni meeting on Wednesday 14 Mar 2012 6-7 pm

Speakers
Abdullah AlDosari, BDS, MSD, PhD

Dr. AlDosari graduated form King Saud University, College of Dentistry, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia in 1982

He then obtained his MSD and PhD from Indiana University, School of Dentistry, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA

He held the position of Dean of the College of Dentistry, King Saud University

Currently, he is the Chairman of Oral Medicine and Diagnostic Department, College of Dentistry, King Saud University.

He also is the Editor-in-Chief of the King Saud University Journal of Dental Sciences

Dr. AlDosari has many Scientific publications in oral cancer and primary health care fields

Dr. AlDosari is the author and co-author of many books including "Clinician Guide to Oral Health in Geriatric Patients. Monograph"

 


Speakers
Nadia Al-Hazmi, BDS, PhD

Dr. Nadia received her BDS degree from the Faculty of Dentistry, King AbdulAziz University.

She was awarded a position in the Oral Biology Division and awarded a scholarship to the United Kingdom where she obtained her Ph.D. in Oral Biology from University College London (UCL).

Her Ph.D. study was in Cell Biology with particular reference to squamous cell carcinoma cell behavior.

Dr. Nadia has particular interest in Tobacco Use, trends and behaviors, and joined the Oral Health Network on Tobacco use Prevention and Cessation that was held in Zagreb-Croatia in 2008. Since then she has published several articles and has been actively working in the field through seminars at the undergraduate level, joining the WHO World "No Tobacco Day campaign" for two years in a row with KAU interns, through various lectures at the SDS, and by conducting various researches in the field of tobacco use.

 

 


Speakers
Stanley A. Alexander, DMD

Dr. Stanley Alexander is currently Professor and Chairman of the Department of Pediatric

He previously held the position as Chairman of the Department of Children's Dentistry, Distinguished Teaching Professor and Dentistry, Tufts University, School of Dental Medicine

He received his DMD degree from Tufts in 1975, his Certificate in Pediatric Dentistry from Harvard in 1978, a Certificate as a Research Fellow in Oral Surgery from the Massachusetts General Hospital in 1978, and a Certificate in Orthodontics from Columbia University in 1986.

He is a Diplomate of both the American Board of Pediatric Dentistry and the American Board of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedicsnguished Service Professor at Stony Brook University

 


Speakers
Anas Omar Aloum, BDS

Dr. Aloum is a former part time teacher in the Advanced Prosthodontics program in the Herman Ostrow School of Dentistry University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California.

He received a certificate in Prosthodontics from the Herman Ostrow School of Dentistry University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, USA in December 2010.

He also has received training in implant dentistry at the Periodontology department, the Herman Ostrow School of Dentistry University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, USA in 2011.

Dr. Aloum has published Scientific articles in implant dentistry and has presented lectures at national and international conferences.

 


Speakers
Khalaf F. Al-Shammari, DDS, MS

Dr. Al-Shammari earned his dental degree from the University of Missouri-Kansas City (USA) in 1996 and a certificate and a master's degree in periodontics from the University of Michigan in 2001. He has a Post-Doctoral Fellowship in Periodontics and Implant Dentistry, University of Michigan. He is also a Diplomate, the American Board of Periodontolog

He is currently an associate professor in the Department of Periodontology at Kuwait University.

Former Vice Dean for Research and Student Affairs and Past President of the Kuwaiti Division of the IADR.

He has published over 20 articles in influential international dental journal. He won awards such as Balint Orban Memorial Research Competition in 2001.

Research interests include: Diabetes complications in relation to periodontal disease; oral health promotion and barriers to seeking preventive care in the region; risk factors for tooth loss and periodontal disease.


Speakers
Alberto Bedgoni, MD

He is involved in many basic research projects: bisphosphonate-associated jawbone disease, bio-molecular markers in head and neck cancer, peripheral nerve regeneration and tissue engineering

Dr. Ablerto graduated from the University of Modena (Italy), Faculty of Medicine, 1988- 1994.

Assistant professor of Maxillofacial Surgery, Section of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Department of Morphological and Biomedical Sciences, University of Verona; Consultant, Unit of Dentistry and Maxillofacial Surgery, University Hospital of Verona.

Dr. Ablerto is a member of the Italian Society of Maxillo-Facial Surgery (S.I.C.M.F.), AOCMF, the European Association for Maxillofacial Surgery (E.A.C.M.F.S.), Italian Society of Oral Pathology and Medicine (S.I.C.M.F.), and the Italian Society of Microsurgery (S.I.M.).

Dr. Alberto is the author of more than 60 Scientific papers, and 5 book chapters.


Speakers
Uwe Blunck, DDS, PhD

Dr. Blunck graduated from the School of Dentistry, University of Berlin and he received the Doctorate degree from the same university in 1987.

Currently, Dr. Blunck holds the position of Assistant Professor in the Department of Operative Dentistry, Endodontics, and Periodontology, College of Dentistry.

Dr. Blunck has earned the Award of the German Dental Association for Operative Dentistry for the best Scientific presentation.

He is a member of many societies and editorial boards in Germany and abroad.

He has over 30 research papers and abstracts and has authored several book chapters. His main research interest is the adhesive systems, minimal-invasive dentistry and Ceramic restorations.


Speakers
Winston Chee, DDS

Dr. Winston Chee is the Ralph W. and Jean L. Bleak Professor of Restorative Dentistry at the School of Dentistry, University of Southern California. He is on the editorial board of the Compendium of continuing education in Dentistry and a Consultant on Implant Dentistry to the Council of Dental Materials Equipment and Devices, American Dental Association.

He is a Diplomate of the American Board of Prosthodontics and has been a full time faculty member of the University of Southern California School of Dentistry since 1986. He has developed and taught courses at the pre and post doctoral levels, published over 50 articles on dental materials and implants in peer reviewed journals and lectured world wide on the subject of implant dentistry. He is a Fellow of the American College of Prosthodontists, Fellow of the American College of Dentists, Member of the American Academy of Restorative Dentistry, CAIC study club, Academy of Osseointegration, ADA, CDA and San Gabriel Valley Dental Society.

At present he is the Director Implant Dentistry and Co-Director of the Advanced Prosthodontics Program. He also maintains a Private Practice Limited to Prosthodontics in Pasadena, California.


Speakers
Sami Chogle, BDS, DMD, MS

Dr. Chogle is the Post-Graduate Endodontic Program Director at the Boston University Institute for Dental Research and Education Dubai UAE and Adjunct Associate Professor of Endodontics at Boston University Henry M. Goldman School of Dental Medicine, Boston MA, USA.

In 1998, Dr. Chogle joined Case Western Reserve University Cleveland Ohio, to earn his master's degree in Endodontics. Upon graduation in 2000, he was offered a faculty position in the Department of Endodontics and in 2003 was Director of the Undergraduate Endodontic clinic

Dr. Chogle earned his D.M.D. degree in (2003), and became a Diplomate of the American Board of Endodontics in (2008).

Dr. Chogle is currently the principal investigator of a University Presidential Research Grant to assess the use of nanotechnology in the Endodontic surgical field. At the state and national association level, he serves on the American Association of Endodontics Regenerative committee, as a judge for resident presentations.

Internationally, Dr. Chogle has been invited to give presentations in the field of Endodontic instrumentation and dental management of trauma in countries including the US, UAE, Saudi Arabia, Jordan and Kuwait.

Dr. Chogle Continues to hold a position as an Adjunct Associate Professor at Case Western Reserve, School of Dental Medicine, Cleveland, USA. Dr. Chogle is well published in peer-reviewed journals and is currently a guest editor for the Dental Clinics of North America Journal.


Speakers
Gunnar Dahlen, DDS, PhD

Dr. Dahlen was the Dean, Faculty of Odontology, University of Gothenburg and currently holding the position of Professor and Chairman in Oral Microbiology, University of Gotheburg

He participated in the teaching of dental students and dental hygienists.

Dr. Dahlen acted as an administrator and member of many research institutes and societies: Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, Faculty of Odontology, member of the Faculty Board, University of Gothenburg, member of the Board for Internationalization of the University of Gothenburg, member of the Board for the Center for East and Southeast and Asian studies, University of Gothenburg.

He is a research reviewer for many dental journals and published over 200 original papers in peer-reviewed journals, 13 review papers and 5 book chapters

Dr. Dahlen awarded the Elander prize, Goteborg Dental Association and Acta Odontologica Scandinavica Scientific Prize.


Speakers
Christer Dahlin, DDS, PhD, Dr Odont

Dr. Christer Dahlin is Professor in Guided Tissue Regeneration at the Department of Biomaterials Science, Institute for Surgical Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.

Consultant in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery with focus on implant treatment at NAL Medical Centre Hospital, Trollhättan. He is Founding Program Director for the Postgraduate Program in Oral Implantology at Nicolas and Asp University College, Dubai, UAE. He is also a member of the editorial board for Clinical Implant Dent and Related Research , Clinical Oral Implant Research, Int J Periodontics and Restorative Dentistry, Titanium and Dental Traumatology. Courtesy Professor College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, USA.

Prof Dahlin has over twenty years experience in implant treatment and related research and has published numerous articles and book chapters.

He is considered one of the pioneers in the development of the concept of Guided Bone Regeneration. He frequently travels worldwide to lecture, conduct research and teach on this and implant-related topics.


Speakers
Carla A. Evans, DDS, DMSc

Professor and Head in the Department of Orthodontics, College of Dentistry, University of Illinois at Chicago, as well as Professor of Bioengineering in the College of Engineering.

She is a graduate of the University of Michigan School of Dentistry and earned her orthodontic specialty certificate in the Harvard University, Forsyth Dental Center program in combination with the Doctor of Medical Sciences in Oral Biology degree at Harvard University.

She is a diplomate of the American Board of Orthodontics and was chosen to give the prestigious E.H. Angle lecture at the 2010 American Association of Orthodontists meeting in Washington DC. She has been an accreditation site visitor for the Commission on Dental Accreditation and served on the Dental Advisory Council of the National Institute of Dental Research.

Her approximately 150 publications covering many topics in orthodontics.

Dr. Evans' research interests include normal and abnormal facial growth and development, application of computer imaging to orthodontic diagnosis and treatment planning, orthodontic materials, and evaluation of treatment outcomes.


Speakers
Donald J. Ferguson, DMD, MS

Dr. Ferguson is Professor and Dean, Nicolas and Asp College of Postgraduate Dentistry in Dubai, UAE.

SHe is formerly Professor and Chair of Orthodontics at Boston University, Executive Director, Center for Advanced Dental Education at Saint Louis University, and Chair of Orthodontics and Director, Advanced Orthodontic Training Program, Marquette University.

Dr. Ferguson is a Diplomate of the American Board of Orthodontics (ABO) and past president of the EH Angle Society, Midwest Component. He served as a senior Fulbright scholar (a US national scholar award) at Alexandria University, Egypt, and has lectured extensively at university, regional, national and international forums.

He received his dental degree from University of Oregon and an MSD in orthodontics from University of the Pacific. His research interests include bone biology and tissue healing related to rapid tooth movement.

He has authored over 100 articles and abstracts for many professional journals and publications as well as contributed chapters to several textbooks.


Speakers
Mauro Fradeani, MD, DDS

Consultant in Prosthodontics and Aesthetic Dentistry, Italy. He is Founder and Director of ACE Institute, Advanced Continuing Education centre in Pesaro, Italy and he is Founder Member of Identalclub. Visiting Associate Professor in Prosthodontics at Louisiana State University - New Orleans (USA) from 1999 until 2008

He is the author of the book "Esthetic Rehabilitation in Fixed Prosthodontics" edited by Quintessence International: Vol 1 "Esthetic Analysis translated into 10 languages and Vol 2"Prosthetic treatment: a systematic approach to esthetic, biologic and functional integration" translated into 6 languages.

After graduating in medicine and surgery in 1979, Mauro Fradeani completed a specialization in dentistry at the University of Ancona, Italy in 1983.

Past President of the European Academy of Esthetic Dentistry (2003/2004) and Past President of AIOP - Accademia Italiana di Odontoiatria Protesica (biennial 1999/2000). He is an Active Member of The American Academy of Esthetic Dentistry, and he maintains membership in The American Academy of Fixed Prosthodontics.

He is an Associate Editor of The European Journal of Esthetic Dentistry (EJED), Member of the Editorial Board of Practical Periodontics and Aesthetic Dentistry (PPAD) and of the Journal of Esthetic and Restorative Dentistry (JERD).

He runs a private practice limited solely to prosthetics on natural dentition and on implants in Pesaro (Italy).


Speakers
Basem Tarek Jamal BDS, DSc

Dr. Jamal graduated with the degree of honors from the Faculty of Dentistry, King AbdulAziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia in 2002

He then earned his clinical training certificate in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery from Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA, USA, in 2008.

In 2010, He received a Doctorate of Science degree in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and Molecular and Cell Biology on Oral Cancer, Boston University, Boston MA USA.

Dr. Jamal then obtained a Head and Neck Surgical Oncology Fellowship from the Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Boston Medical Center, Boston MA USA.

Dr. Jamal is a Diplomate of the American Board of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons, a member of the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons, and a Fellow of the American Head and Neck Cancer Society and the Oral Cancer foundation.

Dr. Jamal received several awards and honors such as The Straumann Scientific Paper Award in 2008 and the AO Craniomaxillofacial Paper award in 2007

Dr. Jamal has several Scientific publications and is the co-author of two book chapters

Currently, Dr. Jamal is an assistant professor and consultant of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and Head and Neck Surgical Oncology at King AbdulAziz University Faculty of Dentistry and King AbdulAziz University Hospital.


Speakers
Emad Khan, BDS, MS, PhD

Dr. Emad Khan graduated first in his class earning his BDS from King AbdulAziz University - Faculty of Dentistry, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. He earned his MS degree in Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, and PhD degree in Oral Biology, from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC-CH).

Dr. Khan is a Diplomate of the American Board of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology (ABOMR) and a Fellow of the Academy of General Dentistry (AGD). He is an active member in several professional organizations such as the Saudi Dental Society (SDS), the American Academy of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology (AAOMR), International Association of DentoMaxillo-Facial Radiology (IADMFR), AGD, and the American Dental Education Association (ADEA).

Dr. Khan has received several awards and honors. He has been inducted to The Orderof the Grail-Valkyries Honor Society. He received Howard R. Raper Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology Award two consecutive years that made him the first to ever win two, Turner Award four years (the first to ever win four), and Advanced Education Fellowship Award, two years in a row. He was listed in the "Guide to America's Top Dentists", 2005-2006 and 2007 Editions. And he received Spurgeon Table Clinic Award, two years consecutively.

Dr. Khan's research interest includes digital and advanced imaging, advanced technology in dentistry, caries diagnosis, and teaching methodology. Dr. Khan is also interested in the leadership and management and has a certificate in non-profit management from Duke University and the Graduate Leadership Program certificate from UNC-CH in addition to the "Total Leadership" diploma of LMI program.

Currently, Dr. Emad Khan is an assistant professor and consultant and head of the division of oral and maxillofacial radiology and the supervisor of oral radiology clinics at KAUFD, where he is also a member of the board of directors.


Speakers
Edward A. McLaren, DDS

Dr. McLaren attended the University of Redlands where he graduated Phi Beta Kappa and Magna Cum Laude. He received his D.D.S. from the University of the Pacific School of Dentistry, where he graduated Omicron Kappa Upsilon. After several years of general practice, he received his specialty certificate in Prosthodontics from UCLA School of Dentistry.

Dr. McLaren is a Professor in the Biomaterials and Advanced Prosthodontic department. He is also an Adjunct Assistant Professor for the University of Oregon Dental School. Dr. McLaren maintains a private practice limited to prosthodontics and esthetic dentistry in which he does all of his own ceramics. He is the director of the UCLA Center for Esthetic Dentistry, a full time didactic and clinical program for graduate dentists. He is also the founder and director of the UCLA Master Dental Ceramist program.

Dr. McLaren is a member of the American College of Prosthodontists, Pacific Coast Society of Prosthodontists, International College of Prosthodontists, Fellow of the American Academy of Esthetic Dentistry, International Association of Dental Research, American Association of Dental Research, American Dental Association, and the California Dental Association.

Dr. McLaren is a board member and project director for Clinicians Report (formally Clinical Research Associates); he is the lab section editor for Inside Dentistry Magazine, the Techno-Clinical editor for spectrum magazine, on the editorial review board of Practical Procedures and Aesthetic Dentistry magazine and on the editorial review board for Contemporary Esthetics magazine.

Dr. McLaren is actively involved in many areas of prosthodontic and materials research and has authored over 60 articles. He is performing ongoing clinical research on various restorative systems. He has presented numerous lectures, hands-on clinics and postgraduate courses on ceramics and esthetics across the nation and internationally. He recently published a book, on his ceramic techniques and features dental photographic art, entitled 'The Art of Passion: Ceramics, Teeth, Faces, and Places.'

To learn more about Dr. McLaren, please visit his site at: www.edmclaren.com



Speakers
Hessam Nowzari, DDS, PhD

Dr. Hessam Nowzari is the Director of Advanced Periodontic in Herman Ostrow School of Dentistry of USC.

He is a Diplomate of the American Board of Periodontology and holds a PhD in Biology and Health Sciences.

He is the founder of the Taipei Academy of Reconstructive Dentistry in Taiwan, the president of the Pan Pacific Reconstructive Annual Meetings in Taipei, and one of only two American members of the Dniepropetrovsk State Academy of Medical Sciences in Ukraine.

Dr. Nowzari has served as one of the selected Scientific experts on an international panel charged with assessing and ranking research proposals for the Ministry of Education and Research, section of medical engineering, in Italy and was reappointed in 2009.

He was elected to the Italian Board of Experts for evaluating medical products for patient safety and health integrity in 2004.

He is the Editor of one of the leading reference publications, Aesthetic Periodontal Therapy: PERIODONTOLOGY 2000, and is on the editorial board of Clinical Implant Dentistry and Related Research and Compendium of Continuing Education in Dentistry, and a member of the review committee for Journal de Parodontologie and d'Implantologie Orale in France.

Dr. Nowzari is the Producer of the movie: "The Enemy of The Smile", the winner for the Best Short Documentary in Beverly Hills Film, TV and New Media Festival 2010 and International Family Film Festival 2011.

He was awarded by the Minister of Health in Taiwan for his Global Oral Health initiatives, efforts, and his film in March 2011.



Speakers
Claes Reit, DDS, PhD

Dr. Reit is currently Professor and Chairman of the Department of Endodontology.

He received a Swedish specialist license in Endodontology in 1984 and a PhD at the University of Gothenburg in 1986. His research activities are focused on clinical decision-making, Endodontic treatment strategies and dental ethics.

Dr. Reit has given numerous courses nationally and internationally to academicians, specialists and general practitioners. He has published widely and co-authored the "Textbook of Endodontology" published by Blackwell in 2003

Besides Endodontology, Dr. Reit is also responsible for the graduate and postgraduate training in Moral philosophy and Dental ethics.

 


Speakers
Clifford J. Ruddle, DDS

Dr. Clifford J. Ruddle is the Founder and Director of Advanced Endodontics, an international educational source, in Santa Barbara, California. Additionally, he maintains teaching positions at various dental schools, is a Fellow in both the American and International Colleges of Dentistry, and has authored numerous articles and chapters for leading textbooks.

As an inventor, Dr. Ruddle has designed and developed several instruments and devices that are widely used internationally. He is best known for providing superb education through his lectures, instructional DVDs, and "ONE-ON-ONE" training courses in Santa Barbara, California. ethics.

Internationally recognized as a leading expert in all aspects of clinical Endodontics, Dr. Ruddle is acclaimed for providing superb Endodontic education through his teachings, clinical articles, training manuals and multimedia products. He is the founder and director of Advanced Endodontics, an international educational source in Santa Barbara, California. Dr. Ruddle created the world's first private microEndodontic simulation training center in 1989 and has trained several thousand dentists microscope-assisted Endodontic techniques. He is well known for his ability to empower colleagues and motivate clinicians towards their full potential. Additionally, Dr. Ruddle maintains a private practice limited to Endodontics in Santa Barbara.

To learn more about Dr. Ruddle, please visit his site at: www.endoruddle.com

 


Speakers
Maurice A. Salama, DMD

Dr. Maurice A. Salama completed his undergraduate studies at the State University of New York at Binghamton in 1985, where he received his BS in Biology. Dr. Salama received his DMD from the University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine, where he later received his dual specialty certification in Orthodontics and Periodontics, as well as implant training at the Branemark Center at Penn. He was awarded the George Coslet and Richard Chase Scholarships at the University of Pennsylvania during his post-doctoral studies. Dr. Salama is currently on the faculties of the University of Pennsylvania and the Medical College of Georgia as Clinical Assistant Professor of Periodontics.

Dr. Salama has completed an ADA accredited hospital-based General Practice Residency at Maimonides Medical Center in New York City. In 1988 he had the opportunity to further broaden his clinical horizons through externships at Hebrew University in Jerusalem and Beth Israel Hospital in New York City. His very unique background includes specialized training in Orthodontics, Periodontal Surgery, and Implant Dentistry.

Dr. Salama is an active member in the American Academy of Orthodontics, the American Academy of Periodontics, the Academy of Osseointegration, Alpha Omega International Dental Fraternity, Thomas P. Hinman Dental Society, Georgia Dental Association, and the American Dental Association. He also served as the Dental Expert for Fox (WAGA) TV in Atlanta, Georgia on a weekly basis..

The dual nature of his specialty training makes Dr. Salama a frequent author of dental literature, and a sought-after lecturer nationally and internationally

To learn more about Dr. Salama, please visit his site at: http://www.dentalxp.com/xperts/msalama

 


Workshops
Workshops

Creating Endodontic Excellence

Clifford J. Ruddle, DDS

Director of Advanced Endodontics, Santa Barbara, California, USA. Clinical Associate Professor at Several US Universities

Thursday 15 March 2012 8:30am - 5:30pm at KAU, Faculty of Dentistry Building 11

Outline Predictably successful Endodontics is dependent on shaping canals, cleaning root canal systems, and three-dimensional obturation. Evidence-driven techniques will be presented to demonstrate each procedural step that comprises start-to-finish Endodontics. Specifically, this lecture will address those factors that influence success, including pulpal breakdown, Endodontic anatomy, access cavities, glide path management, working length, shaping strategies, active irrigation, and 3D obturation. Dr. Ruddle will focus on new instrument designs, irrigation fluid dynamics, and recent advancements for filling root canal systems.

Course Objectives: At conclusion, participants should be able to:

  1. Appreciate the role root canal system anatomy plays in treatment success.
  2. Identify new files for negotiating and shaping canals.
  3. Utilize 3D fluid dynamics and obturation methods.

Creating Endodontic Excellence Outlines

  1. Evidence-Based End.
    1. Root Canal System Anatomy
    2. pulpal Breakdown
    3. Lesions of Endodontic Origin
  2. Access Preparatio
    1. Objectives
    2. Armamentarium
    3. Access Techniques
  3. Glide Path Management
    1. Preparation Sequence
    2. Working Length and Patency
    3. Manual versus Mechanical
  4. Shaping Canal.
    1. The Importance of File Desig
    2. Continuous Rotation versus Reciprocation
    3. Apical Diameter and Taper
  5. Disinfection
    1. Emerging Methods
    2. fluid Dynamic
    3. Sonics versus Ultrasonic
  6. 3-D Obturation
    1. Armamentarium and Materials
    2. Warm Gutta Percha Methods
    3. Vertical Condensation

 


Workshops

Anterior Etched Ceramic Restorations (ECRs) A to Z

Edward McLaren, DDS

Director of Advanced Endodontics, Santa Barbara, California, USA

Thursday 15 March 2012 8:30am - 5:30pm at KAU, Faculty of Dentistry Building 12

Outline This Lecture and hands-on course will teach participants the clinical steps for implementing FEPs (functional esthetic prototypes) prior to anterior ECR (veneer) preparation to "trial" the smile for increased predictability of case acceptance. The step-by-step process of 2 different types of ECR preparations based on the esthetically driven desired outcome will be demonstrated and completed by the participants.

Participants will learn and complete procedures such as:

  1. Bonded diagnostic Functional Esthetic Prototypes (mock-ups) using a special composite
  2. Preparations for bonded porcelain with a specific emphasis on how to control tooth reduction.
  3. Preparations to close Diasthema's on one central incisor and peg lateral.
  4. Cementation

Lecture/ Workshop Schedule:

  1. Lecture: "Basics of Smile Design and the Bonded Functional esthetic prototype (FEP's)
  2. break
  3. Demonstration: fabrication of BFEP (bonded mock-up)
  4. Hands-on: Participants fabricate BFEP's on Typodont
  5. Participants fabricate B-FEP's on Typodont
    1. Using a cast generated from a diagnostic wax-up place a thin layer of separating medium on the cast (triad separating medium)
    2. Using the same cast Fabricate a 2mm thick spacer for a custom tray using "coe lab putty (or similar material)" base plate wax ok
    3. Using a Triad TranSheet colorless and adapt / trim the material so the length of the tray is 2mm over the free gingival margin. Cure in the Triad 2000 for 10 minutes.
    4. Trim the tray with carbide burs trim the tray so that the tray just goes to the free gingival margins. A clear custom impression tray is now ready that has a 2mm space for clear impression material
    5. Spray silicone (thin layer) on the cast from the wax-up
    6. Take clear PVS tray material and inject it in the tray and around the teeth on the cast. Seat the tray on the cast. Note: do not use tray adhesive as the tray and the impression material will need to be separated. You now have a detailed impression of your treatment design for the patient.
    7. For the specially prepared typodont- place separator on the margin areas and rubber gingival
    8. Place adhesive on about a 3mm diameter spot on the teeth to be mock-up. Cure
    9. Place the mock-up composite into the PVS custom matrix do not over fill
    10. Seat the Matrix with the tray on the teeth
    11. Remove the Triad tray from the PVS matrix, leaving the matrix on the teeth- again verify there is complete seating.
    12. Remove the excess material that has expelled from the matrix. If there is not enough material i.e. voids apparent at the margins you can add it latter.
    13. Cure through the matrix
    14. Remove matrix and add composite where there are noticeable voids. Reseat the clear VPS matrix; place the Triad tray over the matrix to compress the composite into the desired form. Remove the triad tray. Cure
    15. Remove the PVS matrix.
    16. finish and Polish as would for a normal composite technique. Recommended for this technique: Brasseler ET Diamonds or Carbides, ad the Caulk Enhance kit polishing kit

THE CASE IS NOW READY FOR ECR PREPARATIONS:
Lecture "Anterior Preparations for Etched Ceramics" Topics covered:

  1. Standard preparations with occlusion in mind.
  2. Preparations for Diasthema closure.
  3. No preparation clinical indications
  4. Preparation through the B-FEP
  5. Prototypes

Demonstration: 1 normal central prep, 1 fractured central prep 1 pegged lateral prep, 1 mini prep on lateral, 1 normal Canine for ECR preparations

Participants prepare: 1 normal central prep, 1 fractured central prep 1 pegged lateral prep, 1 mini prep on lateral, 1 normal Canine for ECR preparations

  1. Using depth cutters-make depth cuts facially and on the incisal edge.
  2. Mark with a pencil the depth cuts.
  3. Remove mock-up/tooth structure to depth cuts
  4. Remove any remaining mock-up material
  5. Place facial margins with 8878 or 8876
  6. Place interproximal margins with 8878 or 8876 or diamond disc if slice preparation
  7. Smooth preparation with 8878 or 8876
  8. Round facial-incisal line angle

 


Agenda
Monday, March 12, 2012
8:00 -5:00 Registration
Session M1 : Invited talks (Main Auditorium)
Session Chairs: Prof. Abdullah Al-Shammery / Prof. Khalid Alwazzan
9:00 - 9:45 The Gummy Smile: Hessam Nowzari, DDS, PhD
9:45 - 10:30 Ceramic Wars: The Return of the Ceramist (part I): Edward McLaren, DDS
10:30 - 10:45 Coffee Break
10:45 - 12:00 Ceramic Wars: The Return of the Ceramist (part II): Edward McLaren, DDS
12:00 - 12:45 Opening Ceremony
12:45 - 2:00 Prayer & Lunch Break
Session M2 : Invited talks (Main Auditorium)
Session Chairs: Dr. Mansour Assery / Dr. Yasser Al Rahbini
2:00 - 3:00 Implant Dentistry vs. Tooth Retention: Commercial Implications vs. Reality: Hessam Nowzari, DDS, PhD
3:00 - 4:00 Guided bone regeneration - Current trends: Christer Dahlin, DDS, PhD
4:00 - 4:30 Prayer & Coffee Break
Session M3 : Invited talks (Main Auditorium)
Session Chair: Prof. Amr Bayoumi
4:30 - 5:30 Reconstructive microsurgery of the head & neck: Alberto Bedgoni, M
Session M4 :Contributed Papers (Postgraduate Resident Research Awards) (Hall C)
Session Chairs: Prof. Jamila Farsi / Prof. Ali Habib

2:00 - 2:15 Histocompatibility of Bioceramic Nanoparticulate Bioaggregate and Mineraltrioxide Aggregate: Maymoonah M. Badahdah, BD
2:15 - 2:30Evaluation of Smear Layer removal and Apical Extrusion of Root Canal Debris and Irrigants Using a Brush-Covered Irrigation Needle: Basel M. Abozor, MSc
2:30 - 2:45The Effects of Asthma and Asthma Medications on Dental Caries and Salivary Characteristics in Children: Khlood K. Baghlaf, BD
2:45 - 3:00Clinical and Bacterial Evaluation of Xylitol on Caries and Streptococcus Mutans Levels Among Patients with Fixed Orthodontic Appliances: Reem M. Azad, MSc
3:00 - 3:15Assessment of Changes in Oral Health-related Quality of Life for Special Need Children in Jeddah City: Manal S. Maashi, MSc
3:15 - 3:30Periodontal and Soft Tissues Injuries in Primary Dentition Among a Group of Children in Jeddah City, Saudi Arabia: Hend A. Al Fadhli, BDS
3:30 - 3:45Hard Dental Tissues Injuries in Primary Dentition Among a Group of Children in Jeddah City, Saudi Arabia: Bashaer S. Abdulhadi, BD
3:45 - 4:00Spectrophotometric Analysis for Yttria-Zirconia Ceramics Using Different Ceramic Thicknesses and Substrates: Yasser M. Othman, MSc
4:00 - 4:30 Announcement of Awards Winners and Awards Ceremon

Courses (Hall D)

2:00-5:30Decisions for extensively damaged dentition: Winston Chee, DDS

 


Tuesday, March 13, 2012
8:00 -5:00 Registration
Concurrent Sessions
Session T1 : Invited talks (Hall A)
Session Chairs: Prof. Yousef Talic / Dr. Mohammad Beyari
8:30 - 9:00 Practical Approach to Prosthodonic Therapy: From Planning to Execution: Anas Aloum, BDS
9:00 - 10:30 The role of the prosthodontist in optimizing the esthetic result of implant restorations: Mauro Fradeani, MD, DDS
10:30 - 10:45 Coffee Break
Session T3 : Invited talks (Hall A)
Session Chairs: Dr. Fahad Al-Harbi / Dr. Meshari Al-Otaibi
10:45 - 11:45 Parameters affecting aesthetics with implant restorations: Winston Chee, DDS
11:45 - 12:45 The "New Age" Digital Dental Office and Dental Lab:The Digital Dental Team: Edward McLaren, DDS
12:45 - 2:00 Prayer & Lunch Break
Session T5 : Invited talks (Hall A)
Session Chairs: Dr. Saleh M. Al-Shamrani / Dr. Ahmed M. Al-Kahtani
2:00 - 2:30 Diagnosis and Management of Common Oral Ulcerations: Abdullah AlDosari, BDS, MSD, PhD
2:30 - 3:00 Recent Advances in the Diagnosis and Management of Oral Cancer: Basem Jamal BDS, DSc
3:00 - 4:00 Composite resins - recent developments and the importance of correct light-curing: Uwe Blunck, DDS, PhD
4:00 - 4:30 Prayer & Coffee Break
Session T7 : Invited talks (Hall A)
Session Chair: Dr. Arwa Al-Sayed
4:30 - 5:30 The Enemy of the Smile: Hessam Nowzari, DDS, PhD
Session T2 : Invited talks (Hall B)
Session Chairs: Dr. Mohammad Beyari / Dr. Hassan Halawany
8:30 - 9:00 Teleradiology in Dentistry: Emad Khan, BDS, MS, PhD
9:00 - 9:45 The Challenges of "Surgery first": Carla Evans, DDS, DMSc
9:45 - 10:30 Rapid Orthodontics : An Overview Donald Ferguson, DMD, MSD
10:30 - 10:45 Coffee Break
Session T4 : Invited talks (Hall B)
Session Chairs: Dr. Ahmed Alyamani / Dr. Fawzi Al Ghamdi
10:45 - 11:45 Bisphosphonate related osteonecrosis of the jaws: Alberto Bedogni, MD
11:45 - 12:45 Advanced reconstruction in implant treatment: Christer Dahlin, DDS, PhD, Dr Odont
Session T6 : Contributed papers (Hall C)
Session Chairs: Prof. Najat Farsi / Dr. Hilal Sonbul
2:00 - 2:20Dentin Hypersensitivity: A New Approach for Treating an Old Problem: Ahmed Samir Bakry, PhD
2:20 - 2:40Considerable Aspects of Peri-Implant Tissue Definition, Complication, management: Anas Jan, MS
2:40 - 3:00Visfatin, the Potential Marker of Periodontal Disease and its Role in the Interplay Between Periodontal and Systemic Disease: Avani Pradeep, MD
3:00 - 3:20Dental Management of the Diabetic Patient in the Dental Clinic: Randa Esam Shaker, MSc
3:20 - 3:40Endodontic Irrigation: An Overview of Some Novel Techniques: Taher Al Omari, MSc
3:40 - 4:00 Using Modeling and Stimulation to Improve Oral Health Services Delivery in a Dental Clinic: Mohammad J. AlZahrani, PhD
4:00 - 4:30 Prayer & Coffee Break
4:30 - 4:50Dental Caries in Saudi Arabia; Past, Present and Future: Hala A. Amer, PhD
4:50 - 5:10The Learning Profile of the Undergraduate Dental Students at King Abdulaziz Uni- versity Faculty of Dentistry: Amal M. Sindi, PhD.
5:10 - 5:30Contemporary Issues in Pediatric Dentistry: Omar El Meligy, PhD

Contributed Papers (Poster Presentations [1])

8:30 - 12:30

Courses

8:30 - 12:30 Alveolar Turnover as a Tissue Enhancement Goal in Full Mouth Reconstructions: Hessam Nowzari, DDS, PhD    (Hall D)
2:00 - 5:30 The role of the prosthodontist in optimizing the aesthetic result of implant restoration: Mauro Fradeani, MD, DDS    (Hall B)

 


Wed, March 14, 2012
8:00 -5:00 Registration
Concurrent Sessions
Session W1 : Invited talks (Hall A)
Session Chairs: Dr. Khalid Al-Zoman / Dr. Dina Al-Tayeb
8:30 - 9:00 Risk indicators for tooth loss from periodontal disease : khalaf Al Shammari, DDS, MS
9:00 - 10:30 Smile Design A Multidisciplinary Approach to Restoration and Aesthetic: Maurice Salama, DMD
10:30 - 10:45 Coffee Break
Session W3 : Invited talks (Hall A)
Session Chair: Dr. Khalid Merdad
10:45 - 12:45 Single-File Shaping Technique: Clifford Ruddle, DD
12:45 - 2:00 Prayer & Lunch Break
Session W5 : Invited talks (Hall A)
Session Chairs: Dr. Saud M. Orfali / Prof. Khalid Balto
2:00 - 3:00 The Good and the Right - Philosophical Aspects on Dental Ethics: Claes Reit, DDS,PhD
3:00 - 4:00 Is it necessary to eradicate bacteria in the root canal before permanent root filling? A discussion on possibilities and methods to achieve the goal: Gunnar Dahlin,DDS, PhD
4:00 - 4:30 Prayer & Coffee Break
Session W7 : Invited talks (Hall A)
Session Chair: Prof. Hanna Jamjoom
4:30 - 5:30 The Shade Triology: Edward McLaren, DDS
Session W2 : Invited talks (Hall B)
Session Chairs: Dr. Aiman Johar / Dr. Osama Al-Othm
8:30 - 9:30 Screw retained vs Cement retained restorations: What does an ideal abutment for a cemented implant restoration look like?: Winston Chee, DDS
9:00 - 10:00 Customizing Endodontic therapy: Sami Chogle, BDS, DMD, MSD
10:00 - 10:30 Tobacco Use Cessation as an essential part of Dental Clinical Excellence: a paradigm shift : Nadia Al-Hazmi, BDS, PhD
10:30 - 10:45 Coffee Break
Session W4 : Invited talks (Hall B)
Session Chairs: Dr. Ali Al-Ehaideb / Dr. Fahad Alsulaimani
10:45 - 11:45 The Past and Future of Imaging in Orthodontics: Carla Evans, DDS, DMSc
11:45 - 12:45 An Exercise and Application of Evidence-Based Orthodontics and Pediatric Dentistry: Stanley Alexander, DMD
Session W6 : Contributed papers (Hall C)
Session Chairs: Dr. Saffia Al-Attas / Dr. Aiman AlDarrab
2:00 - 2:20 Diabetes Mellitus: Considerations During Orthodontic Treatment: Mona Abbasy, PhD
2:20 - 2:40 The Role of RHO GTPASE Signaling Pathway in Embryonic Stem Cell Differentiation to Bone Cartilage: Dalea M. Bukhary, MSc
2:40 - 3:00 The Mode of Cement Failure for Complete Crown Restorations Prepared with Different Tapes and Luted with Conventional and Adhesive Cement: Mohamed F. Ayad, PhD
3:00 - 3:20 Taming of Resistant Complete Denture Patients: Mohammad Khaled A. Azzam, PhD
3:20 - 3:40 Effectiveness of Titanium Mesh in Orbital Floor Reconstruction and Prevention of Associated Ocular Complications: Mohammad A. Elshall, PhD
3:40 - 4:00 Submental Intubation: A great Alternative to Tracheostomy in Severe Facial Trauma: Alaa Bad ghaish, BDS
4:00 - 4:30 Prayer & Coffee Break
4:30 - 4:50 Trigeminal Neuralgia Newer Surgical Techniques & Case Reports: Kamran Bokhari, MDS
4:50 - 5:10 Topical Pimecrolimus Effect on Fas Inducing Apoptosis in Oral Lichen Planus: A clinical Immunohistochemical Study: Suzan Ibrahim, PhD
5:10 - 5:30 Tempomandibular Joint Involvement in Rheumatoid Arthritis; A Luminous Magnetic resonance Imaging Break Through: Hazem Marzouk, PhD

Contributed Papers (Poster Presentations [2])

8:30 - 12:30

Courses (Hall D)

2:00 - 5:30Site Preparation and Augmentation Techniques in the Esthetic Zone: Maurice Salama, DMD

 


Thu, March 15, 2012
8:00 -5:00 Registration

Hands-On Workshops (KAU, Faculty of Dentistry)

8:30 - 5:30Anterior Etched Ceramic Restorations (ECRs) A to Z: Edward McLaren, DDS
8:30 - 5:30Creating Endodontic Excellence: Clifford Ruddle, DDS

 


Programs

Ceramic Wars in 3D: The Return of the Ceramis

Edward McLaren, DDS

Professor, Biomaterials and Advanced Prosthodontic department, University of Oregon Dental School, USA

Abstract:
The role of the ceramist in the delivery of highly esthetic ceramic restorations has been significantly and forever altered by the increased development and evolution of digitally created restorations. There is a clash or "war" in philosophies how human artistic expression can co-exist with the digital "machine world" as Ceramists struggle with how to adapt to the changing conditions, and themselves evolve their skills and services to survive and thrive in this new reality. So much so a global question is being asked, "What is left for me?"

The 2 most important areas for the foreseeable future where Ceramists can apply and excel in using their creative talents is in creating single anterior teeth, and the "Minimalistic ceramic layering" of anterior teeth (which machines can't do).

This presentation will cover the clinical and laboratory techniques for the single anterior restoration and minimalistic veneering of anterior natural teeth (called the "Mini").

  1. Layering concepts and color control for anterior teeth
  2. Minimalistic layering techniques for minimal and no-prep veneers
  3. Clinical concepts for working with minimalistic veneers
Add to Calendar

 


Programs

Implant Dentistry vs. Tooth Retention. Commercial Implications vs. Reality

Hessam Nowzari, DDS, PhD

Professor and Director of Advanced Periodontic, School of Dentistry, University of Southern California, USA

Abstract: The purpose of this meeting is to provide scholarly insight into implant dentistry whereby different aspects of dental implantology can be objectively evaluated and criticized. A major focus of the meeting is to evaluate the topic of implant placement vs. tooth retention. The presentation is based on objective interpretation of available data and does not cater to any commercial interest in order to provide a forum for academic discussion that is open and unfettered by conflict of interest.

Topics to be discussed:

  1. Critical analysis of different implant systems
  2. Dental implants in health and disease
  3. Decision making: an evidence-based and decision-analysis approach
  4. Implant associated complications

Add to Calendar

 


Programs

Guided Bone Regeneration - Current trends

Christer Dahlin, DDS, PhD, Dr Odont

Professor, Department of Biomaterials Science, Institute for Surgical Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Sweden

Abstract:
The biological principle of Guided Bone Regeneration (GBR) has been in clinical use for almost two decades and is today an established technique worldwide. The speaker is considered one of the pioneers in the development of the biological principle of GBR. This presentation will address the most recent findings with regard to biological mechanisms of GBR and its clinical implications.

The lecture will also discuss the special issues regarding Vertical Ridge Augmentation. Furthermore, current trends in the combination of the GBR principle and the use of various bone filling materials will be addressed. The use of bioactive membranes and BMP in combination with GBR will be discussed. Finally, state of the art clinical recommendations step by step will be presented.

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Programs

The Gummy Smile

Hessam Nowzari, DDS, PhD

Professor and Director of Advanced Periodontic, School of Dentistry, University of Southern California, USA

Outline:
Aesthetics is an inseparable part of today's dental treatment; however, consistency of results, reliability of treatment modalities and long-term prognosis require Scientific approaches to therapeutic procedures. Concepts developed in this meeting outline the importance of proper diagnosis and treatment planning. A comprehensive reviews of the restorative, orthodontic and periodontal aspects of treatment will be provided and periodontal surgical techniques will be presented and discussed.

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Programs

Reconstructive microsurgery of the head & neck

Alberto Bedgoni, MD

Assistant Professor, Section of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Department of Surgery, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Integrata (AOUI), Verona, Italy

Abstract: Immediate reconstruction of head and neck defects using free tissue transfer is a successful and reliable method and is becoming the gold standard at many institutions. Microvascular surgery is a predictable and relatively safe method for the reconstruction of bone and soft-tissue defects of the face, provided that experience with these techniques has been achieved. Yet, a standardized and practical approach should be used when treating this challenging and complex area, that can be viewed as consisting of 5 essential stages: 1- defect assessment, 2- preoperative planning and flap selection, 3- tissue-sparing harvesting of the flap, shaping, anastomoses and flap inset, 4- postoperative care and monitoring of potential complications; 5- correction surgery and prosthetic finalization; 6- functional assessment of results. The essential details of each step are highlighted. Meticulous attention to all steps is important because each plays a crucial role in the overall success of the facial rehabilitation. Workhorse flaps will be discussed and the standard indications for their use outlined for each defect type.

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Programs

Practical Approach to Prosthodonic Therapy: From Planning to Execution

Anas Omar Aloum, BDS

Consultant in Prosthodontics, Dubai, UAE. Former Assistant Clinical Professor, School of Dentistry, University of Southern California, USA

Abstract:
The presentation will show a variety of clinical cases. The cases vary in complexity from simple to full mouth reconstructions involving teeth and/or dental implants. Provisional restorations are utilized as the blue print for success. The optimal bonding protocol used to lute ceramic restorations also will be addressed. A step-by-step procedure from start to finish will be shown and discussed

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Programs

The role of the prosthodontist in optimizing the esthetic result of implant restorations

Mauro Fradeani, MD, DDS

Consultant in Prosthodontics and Esthetic Dentistry, Italy. Visiting Associate Professor in Prosthodontics at Louisiana State University, USA

Abstract:
A predictable esthetic final result in the anterior region is often largely dependent upon close co-operation between prosthodontist, and implantologist, especially in the case of patients with high smile line.

Tissue management procedures on implants during the provisional phase will be discussed and their importance emphasized in order to integrate anterior restorations into the oral environment in such a way as to achieve esthetic and biological predictability.

Selection of the appropriate ceramic material and technique is fundamental to obtain an excellent result. Nowadays all-ceramic materials allow the clinician to achieve an ideal abutment shape and final restoration contour, both for single restorations and in full-mouth rehabilitations.

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Programs

Parameters affecting esthetics with implant restorations

Winston Chee, DDS

Professor of Restorative Dentistry and Director of Implant Dentistry, School of Dentistry, University of Southern California, US

Abstract:
It is sometimes difficult to obtain ideal esthetic outcomes when restoring missing anterior teeth with dental implants. This presentation will attempt to define the parameters that are within the clinician's ability to impact the outcome and those which are not. A discussion of missing single teeth compared to missing multiple anterior teeth will also be presented.

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Programs

The "New Age" Digital Dental office and Dental Lab: "The Digital Dental Team"

Edward McLaren, DDS

Professor, Biomaterials and Advanced Prosthodontic department, University of Oregon Dental School, USA

Abstract:
The new millennium has brought many advances in dental ceramics. None more important than processing techniques using Cad-Cam technology. These technologies have allowed the use of solid sintered Zirconia based ceramics that could not be used with conventional techniques. Also, existing materials that have been used in pressed glass systems have been developed for use in certain Cad-Cam systems. Thus, today it is possible to generate any type of indirect dental restoration with a Cad-Cam device. This presentation will cover the different types of restoration possibilities 25, "THE CURRENT POSSIBILITIES FOR THE BOUTIQUE DIGITAL DENTAL LAB and IN-OFFICE DIGITAL DENTAL TEAM" , and the clinical and laboratory steps in the process for different types of restorations, along with esthetic enhancements for the use of these ceramics.

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Programs

Diagnosis and Management of Common Oral Ulcerations

Abdullah AlDosari, BDS, MSD, PhD

Professor and Chairman, Department of Oral Medicine and Diagnostic Science, College of Dentistry, King Saud University, Saudi Arabia

Abstract:

Oral ulcerations are the most common type of oral soft tissue changes. Many patients reported severe sufferings before they can get the proper service or advice. This is even after several visits to many clinicians and variable numbers of health institutions.

It will be the purpose of this presentation to shed some light on the appropriate diagnosis and various aspects of treatments and management for commonly countered oral ulcerations in the general dental practice.

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Programs

Teleradiology in Dentistry

Emad Khan, BDS, MS, PhD

Assistant Professor and Head, Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Faculty of Dentistry, King AbdulAziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

Abstract: Teleradiology in dentistry is a fast-growing field and a necessity in the future of dentistry. It is one of the branches or areas of teledentistry which deals with health service, technology, business.

and administration. Once a dentist chooses to use digital radiography s/he will soon have to consider teleradiology due to the globalization and networking within the health-related services like consultation, insurance and education. This presentation will address some aspects of teleradiology in dentistry with some considerations relevant to private practice, educational institutes and regulatory organizations.

 


Programs

Recent Advances in the Diagnosis andManagement of Oral Cancer

Basem Tarek Jamal BDS, DSc

Assistant Professor, Department of Oral andMaxillofacial Rehabilitation, Faculty of Dentistry, King Abdulaziz University, Saudi Arabia

Abstract: Oral cancer is an insidious disease that affects over 274,000 new patients annually. Oral cancer is the 12th most common cancer worldwide but the 3rdmost common in Saudi Arabia. Despite advances in diagnostic modalities and therapies, the 5-year survival for oral cancer is about 50%. The 5-year survival is reported to be lower (30-35%) for patients with less access to health care and lower income in the US and that population constitute the majority of patients with head and neck cancer in general in Saudi Arabia. Adequate evaluation and staging are paramount in providing patients with the best chance for cure and survival. Oral cancer usually originates from asymptomatic premalignant lesions. This presentation will provide an overview and update on the clinical and laboratory diagnosis of oral precancerous and cancerous lesions to enable early diagnosis and will also review current management guidelines . Also recent advances in molecular techniques and studies thatmight enable earlier diagnosis and bettermanagement of cancer patients will be presented.

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Programs

Composite resins - recent developments and the importance of correct light-curing

Uwe Blunck, DDS, PhD

Assistant Professor, Department of Operative Dentistry, Endodontics and Periodontology, College of Dentistry, University of Berlin, Germany

Abstract: Composite resins are the material of choice for direct anterior as well as for posterior restorations. The improvement from the first macrofilled composites with stained and rough surfaces to composites highly polishable and sufficiently wear resistant even in load-bearing occlusal areas is tremendous. The basic ingredients,monomers and fillers, did not change, however,manufacturers and researchers changed the composition of monomers, fillers and silane to the many available products including so called aesthetic composites, flowable composites with different viscosities and recently launched so called bulk-fill products.

All desired properties of composite resins like adequate strength, high wear resistance and polishability are only provided after sufficient polymerization. Because most composite resins are cured by light, the handling of an appropriate light source is a very important step toward long lasting direct composite resin restorations.

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Programs

The Enemy of the Smile

Hessam Nowzari, DDS, PhD

Professor and Director of Advanced Periodontic, School of Dentistry, University of Southern California, USA

Outline: An early-in-life oral infection with the potential to reach epidemic proportions is threatening the health of youths around the world. The silent disease is targeting thousands of children and young adults, their smiles and, consequently, their emotional and psychological lives. The aim of this presentation is to help raise the level of awareness, so that those who have the power and knowledge can address the suffering of the youngest members of societies. Protecting and restoring the smiles of affected victims can enhance health and confidence, diminish anxiety and negative feelings and, thus, encourage them to explore new ways of moving forward.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Present the outcome of our international collaboration on this issue.
  2. Identify the negative impact of early-in-life oral infection on the smiles of children around the world.
  3. Understand the mechanism of tissue destruction
  4. Discuss the psychological as well as the physical importance of preventing bone loss
  5. Discuss treatment modalities.

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Programs

Teleradiology in Dentistry

Emad Khan, BDS, MS, PhD

Assistant Professor and Head, Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Faculty of Dentistry, King AbdulAziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

Abstract: Teleradiology in dentistry is a fast-growing field and a necessity in the future of dentistry. It is one of the branches or areas of teledentistry which deals with health service, technology, business.

and administration. Once a dentist chooses to use digital radiography s/he will soon have to consider teleradiology due to the globalization and networking within the health-related services like consultation, insurance and education. This presentation will address some aspects of teleradiology in dentistry with some considerations relevant to private practice, educational institutes and regulatory organizations.

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Programs

The Challenges of "Surgery First"

Carla A. Evans, DDS, DMSc

Professor and Head, Department of Orthodontics, College of Dentistry, University of Illinois, Chicago, US

Abstract: Pre-surgical orthodontic preparation was uncommon for patients requiring orthognathic surgery until the 1960. However, as surgical techniques advanced and the number of patients choosing an orthognathic approach increased, the patients and clinicians desire for optimal esthetic and occlusal results lead to the most common current treatment approach which involves presurgical orthodontic decompensation of the occlusal relationships and attainment of normal dental alignment. As most orthognathic treatment is planned now, the two phases of orthodontic tooth movement, namely before and after orthognathic surgery, require a long treatment time and temporary worsening of facial appearance. Sometimes patients become discouraged.

In recent years, a trend toward implementing treatment plans that achieve immediate facial change has arisen. In "Surgery First" treatment plans, the presurgical orthodontic treatment phase is eliminated or greatly reduced because the jaws are first surgically repositioned into the desired locations. Then active orthodontic tooth movement follows within a few days to capitalize on the potential for accelerated tooth movement accompanying rapid bone turnover. Generally, the teeth are bonded/banded and a passive archwire is placed pre-surgically. A surgical spint fabricated on mounted casts helps the surgeon position the jaws as needed for the planned skeletal change.

Caution is important when embarking on a "Surgery First" course of treatment! Even highly experienced orthodontists and surgeons find it difficult to identify the occlusal relationship that will accompany an ideal facial and functional result. The three dimensional planning process is time-consuming and the surgical movement must be sufficent to allow dental decompensation after the surgical procedure. While patients may desire immediate facial change, it's hard for them to appreciate the level of compliance needed to accomplish the required finishing orthodontic movements after surgery. This lecture will summarize guidelines for choosing the better course of action in specific situations.

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Programs

Rapid Orthodontics: An Overview

Donald J Ferguson, DMD, MSD

Professor and Dean, Nicolas & Asp College of Postgraduate Dentistry in Dubai, UAE.

Abstract: 'Rapid Orthodontics' techniques include orthodontic treatment in combination with selective alveolar corticotomy and often with augmentation alveolar grafting. Benefits of decortication + grafting include:

1) enhanced scope of malocclusion treatment, including a reduction of number of cases needed extractions and/or orthognathic surgery

2) orthodontic treatment times 3X to 4X more rapid

3) greater stability of clinical outcomes and less relapse, and

4) increase alveolar volume and enhanced periodontal health. For the clinicians who intend to accelerate orthodontic treatment, it is critically important to understand the biology following decortication intervention as well as differences among the wide variety of modified techniques that have been presented in the published literature. This presentation provides an overview of "Rapid Orthodontics" techniques as well as appropriate case selection and treatment.

Learning Objectives At the end of the 45 minute presentation, participants should be able to do the following:

  1. Describe the outpatient surgical and grafting techniques
  2. Explain why teeth move rapidly into stable positions
  3. Describe how severe malocclusions can be resolved
  4. Explain the differences among the wide variety of modified decortication techniques.

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Programs

Bisphosphonate related osteonecrosis of the jaws

Alberto Bedgoni, MD

Assistant Professor, Section of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Department of Surgery, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Integrata (AOUI), Verona, Italy

Abstract: Bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (BRONJ) is a severe adverse drug reaction of the treatment with nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates (NBP). BRONJ is most prevalent in patients with cancer using intravenous NBP, but it can also occur in patients taking oral medications for osteometablic bone disorders. Although exposure of necrotic bone in the oral cavity is the most accepted sign of BRONJ, the clinical presentation of BRONJ is patchy and mimics that of other similar diseases, such as dental and periodontal disease, osteoradionecrosis and chronic osteomyelitis. As a result, diagnosis can be difficult. The pathobiology of this complication is not fully understood and management strategies for patients with BRONJ are poorly defind .

A disease-stage classification based almost exclusively on clinical criteria and a stage-oriented management strategy have been proposed that have several important limitations. The recommendations of the Expert panel of the Italian Society for Maxillofacial Surgery (SICMF) and the Italian Society of Oral Pathology and Medicine (SIPMO) on Bisphosphonate-Related Osteonecrosis of the Jaws' will be presented, where definition, diagnostic work-up, staging classification, prevention and treatment strategies have been fully upgraded based on the most recent Scientific advance

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Programs

Advanced Reconstruction in Implant Treatmenty

Christer Dahlin DDS, PhD, DrOdon

Professor, Department of Biomaterials Science, Institute for Surgical Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Sweden

Abstract: Recent development within the field of Tissue engineering has made advanced reconstruction of atrophic Jaws' significantly easier to restore. This presentation will address the latest discoveries in this area. Pros and cons of such techniques vs traditional autogenous bone grafting will be addressed. Furthermore recent advances in sinus-lift procedures will be discussed and also the use of Zygoma implants and distractions technique in the rehabilitation of the atrophic maxilla.

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Programs

Risk Indicators for Tooth Loss from Periodontal Disease

Khalaf Al Shammari, DDS, MS

Associate Professor of Periodontology and former Vice Dean for Research and Student Affairs, Kuwait University, Faculty of Dentistry, Kuwait

Abstract:
Tooth loss is the ultimate endpoint in dentistry, and the true measure of success or failure of dental therapy. The two main reasons for tooth loss in adulthood are caries and periodontal disease, and studies indicate an increasing influence of periodontal disease on reasons for tooth extraction with age. Several factors have been associated with tooth loss due to periodontal disease. This presentation will discuss research findings on patient factors linked with periodontal disease leading to tooth loss, and the clinical implications of these findings as they relate to patient care and preventive practices.

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Programs

Smile Design "A Multidisciplinary Approach to Restoration and Aesthetics"

Maurice A. Salama, DMD

Clinical Assistant Professor of Periodontics, University of Pennsylvania and the Medical College of Georgia, USA

Abstract:
Dental aesthetics has evolved beyond the aesthetic restoration of individual teeth to incorporate beauty in its fullest sense. As the clinician evaluates the philosophy of smile design it becomes obvious that the making of beautiful teeth is but the final phase in aesthetic smile design. The essential element of smile design is the dentist's role in orchestrating labial gingival harmony prior to the creation of the actual teeth.

This program will take you through the 10 essential steps in smile design demonstrating the clinical procedures to diagnose and reconstruct the individual "restorative receptor sites" and their collective arrangement in harmony with the patient's unique, specific lip and facial form.

A new classification system allows for prognostic treatment planning and therapy to avoid failure and ensure restorative aesthetic success. These key issues must be preemptively addressed regardless of whether the restoration is to be Endodontically treated tooth, implant supported, or a pontic. Thereafter, the restorative dentist can select from the plethora of ceramic systems to finalize the case developing the individual teeth in harmony with the dentofacial form.

Learning Outcomes for decision making:

  1. To delineate the essential 10 essential steps to Complete Aesthetics.
  2. Clarify the when to save a tooth and perform endo and when to extract.
  3. Understand the integral role that implants will play in this new millennium.
  4. Delineate the specific resective and additive clinical techniques available to facilitate optimal smile design.
  5. Understand the use of multidisciplinary therapies to achieve successful outcomes.

This multimedia presentation will present key information that is useful to the generalist, specialist and laboratory technician.

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Programs

Single-File Shaping Technique

Clifford J. Ruddle, DDS

Director of Advanced Endodontics, Santa Barbara, California, USA. Clinical Associate Professor at Several US Universities

Abstract: Clinical Endodontics is confronted with a staggering number of different file brands and sequences for shaping canals. The most recent advancements in canal preparation methods have focused on the concept "less is more". Dr. Ruddle will describe a single-file technique for shaping virtually all canals, regardless of their length, diameter, or curvature. This presentation will describe how a new, unique instrument design, superior metallurgical technology, and a novel mechanical movement have converged to create a single-file technique for shaping canals. Emphasis will be placed on creating minimally invasive shapes that promote 3D disinfection and obturation.

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Programs

The Good and the Right - Philosophical Aspects on Dental Ethics

Claes Reit, DDS, PhD

Professor and Chairman, Department of Endodontology, University of Gothenburg, Sweden

Abstract: Value judgments permeates every pore of clinical practice and from a moral view it is often difficult to find the right arguments to reach good and fair clinical decisions. The lecture will take its starting point in a current important clinical problem and give moral aspects on when teeth should (or should not) be replaced by implants. The American philosopher John Rawls's idea of "The reflective equilibrium" will be presented as a tool formoral deliberation to be used in such cases. This idea will be illuminated and contrasted with other contemporary thoughts on ethics.

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Programs

Is it Necessary to Eradicate Bacteria in The Root Canal before Permanent Root filling? A discussion on Possibilities and Methods to achieve the Goal

Gunnar Dahlen, DDS, PhD

Professor and Chairman, Department of Oral Microbiology, University of Gotheburg, Sweden

Abstract:
The goal for Endodontic treatment is to widen the root canal so a proper permanent root filling can be made and by chemo-mechanical means eradicate all microorganisms fromthe root canal system. These two goals gowell together, but the achievement often fails in practice. Among Swedish general practitioners the failure rate is calculated as high as up to 35 %, while for Endodontic specialists it is less than 10%. The high failure rate among general practitioners depends on a number of factors such as insufficient aseptic technique, bacteria in unreachable locations of the root canal system, formation of biofilms and use of weak antiseptics. Furthermore many teeth have a complicated root canal system that should in fact be treated primarily by experienced Endodontic specialists. The lecture will covermethods and antiseptics that should be used to achieve the goal and to reduce the failure rate in the general practice.

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Programs

The Shade Triology

Edward McLaren, DDS

Professor, Biomaterials and Advanced Prosthodontic department, University of Oregon Dental School, USA

Abstract:
Many different techniques have been developed, written about and presented on how to effectively evaluate tooth color and communicate it effectively to the ceramist. Initially shade guides and techniques were developed to visual "take" shades, analog photography and now digital photographic techniques were developed to communicate shade, and more recently we have seen sophisticated computerized shade taking and communicate devices used for this process. This presentation will cover how to effectively integrate all three components into the shade analysis and communication process, "The Shade Trinity". Also discussed will be how to interpret the shade information gathered into the expression of a final ceramic result, called "The Contrast Zone Color System".

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Programs

Screw Retained vs Cement Retained Restorations: What does an Ideal Abutment for a Cemented Implant Restoration look like?

Winston Chee, DD

Professor of Restorative Dentistry and Director of Implant Dentistry, School of Dentistry, University of Southern California, US

Abstract:
Most implant supported restorations are retained with screws or cement. Each of these methods have advantages and disadvantages " these will be outlined. An "ideal" abutment design for a cemented restoration will be proposed.

  1. Materials
  2. Retrievability
  3. Cementation
  4. Fit

Will be addressed with respect to cemented restorations

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Programs

Customizing Endodontic Therapy

Sami Chogle, BDS,DMD, MSD

CAssociate Professor and director, Post-Graduate Endodontic Program, Boston University Institute for Dental Research and Education Dubai, UAE.

Abstract: Endodontic treatment outcomes have been the focus of numerous research studies trying to identify the reasons for failure and thereby yield the 'perfect' treatment approach and techniques. Although no such techniquemay exist, this presentation aims to review the morphological,mechanical and biological factors to help better tackle the Endodontic disease with current armamentarium and techniques. In the process the presentation will elaborate a hybrid apex-based technique to avoid both over and under-instrumentation. At the end of the presentation, the participants would be exposed to:

  1. A review of Endodontic disease
  2. Variation in morphology
  3. Common errors in root canal preparation
  4. Nickel-titaniumbased hybrid techniques
  5. A novel preparation technique CDAC (crown-down with Apical Control)

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Programs

Tobacco Use Cessation as an Essential Part of Dental Clinical Excellence: a paradigm Shift

Nadia Al-Hazmi, BDS, PhD

Assistant Professor, Faculty of Dentistry, King AbdulAziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

Abstract: Since the 70s there has been an advocacy to encourage oral health care providers to actively participate in tobacco use prevention and cessation. Christen wrote: "Many patients want to quit smoking but simply do not know how. The dentist can help them if he has studied the Scientific evidence of the health consequences of smoking and is himself a nonsmoker" (JADA, 1970).

The detrimental effects of tobacco use on oral tissues is well established. Tobacco use is associated with periodontal disease, higher probability of implant failure, pre-malignant lesions, staining, hialitosis and delayed wound healing. To date, 75% of oral cancers are associated to tobacco use. The success of dental treatment is partly dependent on successful behavior modification; this involves improved oral hygiene habits and dietary literacy. However, few recognize tobacco-use as a behavior that negatively impacts any dental treatment. As such, it should be included in the behavior modification paradigm. Oral health care providers can provide their patients with further incentives to quit tobacco habits. This would not only greatly improve the patient's overall health, but will also sustain prolonged benefits of dental treatments. The aim of this talk is to present the overwhelming evidence of the detrimental effects of tobacco use on any dental discipline, and to encourage all oral health care practitioners to incorporate tobacco use prevention and cessation as an essential component of behaviormodification in the pursuit of excellence.

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Programs

The Past and Future of Imaging in Orthodontics

Carla A. Evans, DDS, DMSc

Professor and Head, Department of Orthodontics, College of Dentistry, University of Illinois, Chicago, US

Abstract: The digital world is affecting orthodontics in many ways, including how treatment is planned, documented, and evaluated. As the profession transitions into electronic patient records and from 2D to 3D, many new options and problems are appearing. This lecture will review the history of imaging in orthodontics, discuss current opportunities and obstacles in the transition to 3D, and summarize some ongoing activities of committees in organized dentistry and government related to interoperable and transportable electronic patient records, the development of 3D norms, and potential regulatory issues such as the appropriate use of cone beam computed tomographic (CBCT) imaging

Consensus is key to facilitating worldwide digital communications related to orthodontics. The dearth of 3D norms and standards complicates diagnosis and treatment, plus communication is hampered by the persistence of software packages with proprietary formats for clinical data and images. Clinicians and patients become inconvenienced greatly when the software company fails, the doctors' priorities change, or information must be moved to other applications or to colleagues who have different software.

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Programs

An Exercise and Application of Evidence-Based Orthodontics and Pediatric Dentistry

Stanly A Alexander, DMD

Professor and Chairman, Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Tufts University, School of Dental Medicine, USA

Abstract: An overview of various topics in orthodontics and pediatric dentistry as they relate to current evidence in the dental literature is discussed. These include the areas of growth and development, cephalometrics, palatal expansion, appliance usage,fluoride and sealant treatment, ectopic canines and impactions, and Class II and III treatment. An exercise in the ranking of evidence-based material, as they apply to these topics, is included with audience participation. You will learn:

  1. How evidence-based information is ranked
  2. To evaluate the literature and techniques based upon evidence.
  3. How new evidence-based information has changes clinical protocols.
  4. How clinicians can participate in the evidence-based process.

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Courses
Courses

Decisions for extensively damaged dentition

Winston Chee, DDS

Professor of Restorative Dentistry and Director of Implant Dentistry, School of Dentistry, University of Southern California, USA

Outline: examples of damaged dentition with increasing complexity of treatment will be presented and the partcipants will be asked for evidence based input - emphasis will be placed on obtaining the proper diagnosis and then choosing the proper therapy to reconstruct the patient.

 


Courses

Alveolar Turnover as a Tissue Enhancement Goal in FullMouth Reconstructions

HessamNowzari, DDS, PhD

Professor andDirector of Advanced Periodontic, School ofDentistry,University of Southern California, USA

Outline: Alveolar turnover can be enhanced and dentofacial physiology can be guided by a combination of periodontal, orthodontic, and restorative techniques, in order to restore the smiles of patients affected by oral infections: A silent disease which is targeting children, young adults, and adults, their smiles and, consequently, their emotional and psychological lives.

 


Courses

The role of all-ceramics in the optimization of the esthetic result

Mauro Fradeani,MD, DDS

Consultant in Prosthodontics and Esthetic Dentistry, Italy. Visiting Associate Professor in Prosthodontics at Louisiana State University, USA

Outline: PFMs still remain one of dentistry's primary restorations of choice because of their strength and reliability, however, the use of metal-free ceramic materials allows to achieve excellent esthetic results for veneers, crowns and bridges fabrication on natural dentition and on implants. Material selection with dental ceramist is fundamental in management of complex rehabilitation cases.

Several clinical follow-up of glass ceramic and alumina and zirconia systems indicate the adequacy of these materials for anterior and posterior restorations.

Nowadays an innovative operative protocol allows to face highly compromised clinical situations, even in cases, of full-mouth rehabilitations, with a minimally invasive prosthetic procedure (MIPP) that guarantees an excellent, long lasting esthetic result. Clinical and technical suggestions will be supplied using both pressed and CAD-CAM techniques.

 


Courses

Site Preparation and Augmentation Techniques in the Esthetic Zone

Maurice A. Salama, DMD

Clinical Assistant Professor of Periodontics, Faculties of the University of Pennsylvania and the Medical College of Georgia, USA

Outline: To be a viable treatment choice in the partially edentulous case, the implant-supported restoration must cosmetically equal or surpass that of conventional crown and bridge. This requires development of the edentulous ridge or potential implant restorative site to mimic that of a natural tooth." The essence in the creation of this illusion of reality is the soft tissue restorative frame. The three-dimensional reconstruction of the implant receptor site comprises two distinct phases:

  1. Development of the hard tissues
  2. Reconstruction of the soft tissue

Orthodontic tooth movement can be synergistically combined with periodontal plastic surgical techniques, guided bone regeneration and osseous grafts to effectively establish the optimal foundation for functional and esthetic implant restorations." Vertical soft tissue and interdental papilla enhancement is frequently combined with innovative second-stage periodontal plastic surgery to create an ideal restorative frame.

This program will cover site preparation techniques prior to and at the time of implant placement.

Educational Objectives:

  1. Diagnosis and classification of implant recipient sites
  2. Preservation techniques available for implant replacement
  3. Management of the "deficient" site through augmentation techniques

 


Programs

Endodontic Irrigation: an Overview of Some Novel Techniques

Taher Mohammed Al Omari, MSc.

Consultant in Endodontics, Armed Forces Hospital, Taif, Saudi Arabi.

Abstract: Success of root canal treatment is highly dependent on the chemo-mechanical preparation of the root canals. A wide range of irrigant solutions are used in association with different irrigation instruments. There is no universal consensus on the ideal irrigant or the ideal irrigation device. The last few years have witnessed the emergence of many novel irrigation techniques, devices, and solutions in an attempt to improve the chemical cleaning of the root canal and enhance the elimination of micro-organisms.

The rinsendo system is a new irrigation technique that offers hydrodynamic activation based on the pressure-suction technology, while the EndoVac system depends on the negative pressure technology. In addition, ultrasonic activation of irrigants has been used for some time to increase the efficacy of standard irrigation.

This presentation will provide an insight into the traditionally utilized and novel irrigation techniques with an in-depth review of the literature and comparison of efficacy.

 


Programs

Dentin Hypersensitivity: A New Approach for Treating an Old Problem

Ahmed Samir Bakry, PhD; Masayuki Otsuki, PhD; Hidekazu Takahashi ,PhD and Junji Tagami PhD.

1 Assistant Professor, Division of Operative Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, King AbdulAziz University. Fellow of the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, Tokyo Medical and Dental University.
2Associate Professor at the Cariology and Operative Dentistry, Department of Restorative Sciences, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University.
3 Professor of Oral Biomaterials Engineering, Department of Oral Materials Sciences and Technology, Course of Oral health Engineering, School of health care Sciences, Faculty of Dentistry Tokyo Medical and Dental University
4Professor and chair of the Cariology and Operative Dentistry, Department of Restorative Sciences, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45. Global Center of Excellence Program, ICTB at Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo, Japan.

Abstract: Dentin hypersensitivity is one of the major challenges in dental practice which affects a growing sector of the population worldwide. There are many techniques which were introduced for treating dentin hypersensitivity, however, most of these techniques showed only temporary effect in clinical situation because they were gradually removed by daily brushing, food friction and acidic beverage drinking. This presentation is aiming at introducing an efficient technique for treating dentin hypersensitivity cases using 45S5 Bioglass.

The presentation will show the interface formed between dentin and the protective layer formed from mixing the 45S5 Bioglass powder with phosphoric acid and its ability to seal the dentinal tubules. Moreover, the lecture will show the durability of this protective layer against brushing abrasion challenge of 6000 cycles under wet conditions with a load of 250 gf using a tabletop robot

 


Programs

Effectiveness of Titanium Mesh in Orbital Floor Reconstruction and Prevention of Associated Ocular Complication

Mohammad A. Elshall, PhD.

Assistant Professor and Consultant of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery. Maxillofacial Surgery and Diagnostic Sciences Dept, College of Dentistry, Salman Bin AbdulAziz University, Saudi Arabia.

Abstract: Aim of the work: To evaluate and determine the effectiveness of using titanium mesh (0.4 mm thickness) in orbital floor reconstruction both anatomically and functionally, based on a retrospective study with a long-term follow up of 36 treated patients.

Patients and Methods: All patients were retrospectively analyzed for gender, age, cause of injury, classification of fracture, complications, surgical approach, defect size, effectiveness of orbital floor reconstruction, and adverse outcomes were recorded where present at the regular outpatient follow-up appointments. Titanium mesh was used for reconstructing the orbital floors in all patients. The orbital floor defect size was classified into 3 categories according to its surface area: 1- small (< 2 cm2), 2- medium (2-4 cm2), and 3- large (> 4 cm2).

Results: The sizes of orbital floor defects ranged from 1 cm2 to 6 cm2 with a mean of 2.9 cm2. Diplopia was present in 25 patients (69.4%), enophthalmos was recorded in 19 patients (52.8%) both subjectively and by using Hertel exophthalmometer, and infraorbital numbness was detected in 27 patients (75%). The surgical access to the orbital floor was gained through either transconjunctival (15 patients, 41.7%), or skin incisions (21 patients, 58.3%) using subciliray (8 patients, 22.2%), or subtarsal (13 patients, 36.1%) approaches.

Postoperatively, no cases of permanent complications were recorded at the final follow up appointments for all patients (12-36 months).

Conclusion: The use of titanium mesh with a thickness of 0.4 mm for orbital floor reconstruction was proved to be effective in preventing postoperative ocular complications

 


Programs

Submental Intubation: a Great Alternative to Tracheostomy in Severe Facial Trauma

Hamed H. Al-Bargi*, DMD and Alaa J. Badghaish*, BDS.

*Department of Surgery, King AbdulAziz Medical City, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Abstract: Background: In complex cranio-maxillofacial fractures, nasal and oral intubations are contraindicated or even impossible to be performed.As a solution, submental endotracheal intubation has been introduced to replace tracheostomy.In this retrospective study, we evaluated the safety and efficancy of submental intubation in the management of maxillofacial trauma.

Methods: 26 cases diagnosed with pan facial fractures associated with either skull base fracture or severe nasal deformities and malocclusion secondary to the trauma, were managed surgically using the submental intubation technique

Results: The sizes of orbital floor defects ranged from 1 cm2 to 6 cm2 with a mean of 2.9 cm2. Diplopia was present in 25 patients (69.4%), enophthalmos was recorded in 19 patients (52.8%) both subjectively and by using Hertel exophthalmometer, and infraorbital numbness was detected in 27 patients (75%). The surgical access to the orbital floor was gained through either transconjunctival (15 patients, 41.7%), or skin incisions (21 patients, 58.3%) using subciliray (8 patients, 22.2%), or subtarsal (13 patients, 36.1%) approaches.

Results: This technique was performed on 25 of the patients with no difficulties during intubation or extubation. In addition, the intraoral and submental accesses healed with minimal scarring and no other complications were encountered. One patient became desaturated after the submental intubation due to presence of intratracheal mucus plug, shifting to oral intubation was done with some modifications on the surgical management of the fractures.

Conclusion: Submental intubation is a great alternative to tracheostomy in patients with severe maxillofacial trauma. It is simple and safe as long as the surgical protocol is followed in addition to full awareness of the anatomical structures.

 


Programs

Trigeminal Neuralgia - Newer Surgical Techniques & Case Reports

Kamran Bokhari, MDS..

Assistant Professor in Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, College of Dentistry, Abha, Saudi Arabia

Abstract: Introduction: Trigeminal neuralgia, tic doulourex is a neuropathic disorder characterized by episodes of intense pain in the face, originating from the trigeminal nerve. It has been described as amongst the most painful conditions known. In a majority of the cases, symptoms begin appearing after the age of 50, although there have been cases with patients being as young as three years of age. Females are more affected than males

Clinical Significance: The disorder is characterized by episodes of intense facial pain that last from few seconds to several minutes or hours. Pain attacks are known to worsen in frequency or severity over time. Several theories explain the possible causes of this pain syndrome. Latest research indicates that it is an enlarged blood vessel - possibly the superior cerebellar artery - compressing or throbbing against the microvasculature of the trigeminal nerve near its connection with the pons.

Surgical Technique: The management of trigeminal neuralgia is varied and includes both medical as well as surgical therapy. Among the various drugs prescribed for this condition, anticonvulsants carbamazepine is the first line treatment. Older literature states that the evidence of surgical therapy is poor and is recommended if medical treatment is not effective. Recent literature states that microvascular decompression results in the longest pain relief. Percutaneous radiofrequency thermorhizotomy may also be effective as may gamma knife radiosurgery.

Conclusion: This paper reviews the literature, broadens all the treatment modalities with emphasis on the most latest surgical techniques and highlights few case reports treated.

 


Programs

Topical Pimecrolimus Effect on Fas Inducing Apoptosis in Oral Lichen Planus: A Clinical Immunohistochemical Study

Suzan S. Ibrahim, PhD; Hala H. Hazza, PhD.

1- Associate Professor of Oral Medicine, Department of Oral Medicine, Diagnosis, Periodontology and Radiology, Faculty of Dentistry, Ain Shams University, Egypt and King AbdulAziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabi. 2- Lecturer of Oral Medicine, Diagnosis, Periodontology, Department of Oral Medicine, Diagnosis, Periodontology and Radiology, Faculty of Dental Medicine, Al-Azhar University (Girls Branch), Egypt.

Abstract: Objective: To investigate the effectiveness of pimecrolimus treatment in patients not responding to corticosteroid treatment and to investigate its effect on Fas expression on keratinocytes in oral lichen planus(OLP).

Clinical Significance: The disorder is characterized by episodes of intense facial pain that last from few seconds to several minutes or hours. Pain attacks are known to worsen in frequency or severity over time. Several theories explain the possible causes of this pain syndrome. Latest research indicates that it is an enlarged blood vessel - possibly the superior cerebellar artery - compressing or throbbing against the microvasculature of the trigeminal nerve near its connection with the pons.

Subjects and Methods: Twenty patients with OLP were recruited from the Oral Medicine Clinic at the School of Dentistry, Ain Shams University, Egypt. Pimecrolimus 1% cream with a hydrophilic adhesive gel base was applied to the oral lesions, 4 times daily, for a total of 2 months. A marker lesion was identified, and assessed by clinical scoring (CS). The symptomatology score was obtained using a visual analog scale (VAS). Pretreatment and post treatment specimens were immunohistochemically stained for detecting Fas.

Results: The results of clinical scores showed statistically high significant improvement (p =0.0001). The mean VAS decreased significantly over time as well as the mean of Fas expression (p<0.05). The overall percentage of reduction from baseline to week 8 was 87%, 93%, 67%, for clinical scores, visual analogue score and Fas expression respectively.

Conclusions: Topical pimecrolimus reduced Fas expression and it appears to be a promising alternative treatment for OL

 


Programs

Temporomandibular Joint Involvement in Rheumatoid Arthritis; a Luminous Magnetic Resonance Imaging Break Through

Hazem Marzouk, PhD.

Assistant Professor of Oral & Maxillofacial Radiology, Faculty of Dentistry, King Saud University,Saudi Arabia.

Abstract: Temporomandibular Joint (TMJ) is considered as the only bilateral linked joints in human body capable of a combination of both hinge and sliding movements and Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) as a chronic systemic, inflammatory autoimmune disorder of unknown etiology characterized by early soft tissue involvement and late polyarticular destruction of bone and joint cartilage.

Based on the fact of RA had a peculiar tendency to select TMJ, RA patients with TMJ involvement don't seek treatment because other joints problems had a higher priority for them or because the disease activity varied enough to modulate its symptoms.

Assessment of the TMJ in RA patients is critical as its prevalence has been reported to be high, and it is considered as one of the earlier joints to be involved in RA.

A new Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scoring system for assessment of TMJs arthritic changes in RA was developed and correlated to a well-established precise TMJ tomographic scoring system adopted in 2004.

The new scoring system was termed as RA-TMJ-MRI-S stands for Rheumatoid Arthritis in TMJ by Magnetic Resonance Imaging Score.

 


Programs

Dental Management of the Diabetic Patient in the Dental Clinic

Randa Esam Shaker, MSc

Consultant, General Dentistry, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

Abstract: Diabetes mellitus is the third most common cause of death in the United States with 20 million persons affected by the disease in the US alone which accounts for 6.5% of the population. More than 240 million people worldwide are diagnosed with diabetes. It is estimated that this figure will double or triple within the next 10 years.

In Saudi Arabia, according to a study, the overall prevalence of diabetes mellitus in the adult population is estimated as 23.7%.

Diabetes mellitus is a common chronic disease complex with a multifactorial etiology with both genetic and environmental factors that play a major role in its onset. It has a metabolic component characterized by the elevation of blood glucose levels (hyperglycemia) and a vascular component that affects particularly the eyes and kidneys. The disease can affect the entire body and diabetic patients are at increased risk of developing heart disease, hypertension, stroke, kidney failure, blindness, neuropathy, infections and impaired healing compared to non-diabetic patients.

Diabetes mellitus is of great importance to dentists as they can detect new cases. Dentists should be aware of the symptoms and findings that may suggest diabetes and refer patients for screening.

This lecture will provide participants with an overview about diabetes mellitus, its risk factors, complications, diagnostic criteria, related oral findings, dental treatment and how to manage diabetic emergencies. Knowledge and awareness of the disease will provide better control and quality of life for the patients.

 


Programs

Diabetes Mellitus: Considerations During Orthodontic Treatment

Mona Abbassy, PhD; I. Watari, PhD and T. Ono, PhD

Assistant professor, Division of Orthodontic, Preventive Dental Sciences Department, King AbdulAziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.
Associate Professor, Orthodontic Science, Department of Orofacial Development and Function, Division of Oral Health Science, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo, Japan
Professor, Global Center of Excellence Program; International Research Center For Molecular Science in Tooth and Bone Disease at Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Japan.

Abstract: Objectives: The understanding of mandibular growth is important in the practice of clinical orthodontics. This may have a considerable impact on diagnosis, treatment goals, treatment planning and the eventual outcome of orthodontic treatment. It is well known that Type I Diabetes Mellitus (DM) cause severe growth retardation in hard tissue generally. The goal of this study was to assess the effect of DM on the structure of mandibular bone and on the changes of alveolar/jaw bone formation.

Methods: Experimental DM was induced in 3-week old male Wistar rats by a single dose of 60mg/kg body weight of streptozotocin. All rats were injected with calcein on days 21 and 28. Rats were sacrified 4 weeks after the streptozotocin injection and the right mandible of each rat was dissected. Bone structure was analyzed by bone histomorphometry and microcomputed tomography (micro-CT)

Results: In STZ-DM rats micro-CT analysis showed the significant decrease of bone volume, bone surface and all the trabecular properties indicating the deterioration of the bone quality in DM.Histomorphometric analysis showed the tendency of decrease of bone formation during the growth period.

Conclusion: DM reduces mandibular bone formation, and affects the quality of bone structure resulting in retardation of all craniofacial skeletal development. These findings should be considered when orthodontic problems are diagnosed and treated in DM. A better understanding of how diabetes affects bone will improve our ability to protect bone health during orthodontic treatment in diabetic patients.

 


Programs

Using Modeling and Simulation to Improve Oral Health Services Delivery in a Dental Clinic

Mohammad J. AlZahrani, PhD; Holly Gaff, PhD; Deanne Shuman, PhD and Rani Kadi, PhD.

Prince Sultan Military College of Health Sciences, Dhahran, Saudi Arabia,
Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA, USA
Alhosen University, Abu Dhabi, UAE

Abstract: The purpose of this study is to examine the system performance in delivering oral health services in a public health district based on the Conceptual Framework to Measure Performance of the Public Health System (PHS).

Using modeling and simulation, a predictive model based on the conceptual framework dimensions: mission, structural capacity, processes, and outcomes were developed to predict the performance of public health district in delivering oral health services.

This is a retrospective longitudinal study. Independent and dependent variables under investigation were categorized based on a comprehensive conceptual framework, Public Health System Performance Framework (PHS) dimensions.

The main objective of this study is to use the modeling and simulation approach to develop a simulating model to predict the performance of public health district dental clinic in delivering oral health services. The scenarios based on the existing structural capacities and personnel were modeled and simulated using Rockwell Automation software, Arena "o version 13.5.

Purposeful sample consists of previously selected homogeneous five public health district dental clinics of Hampton Roads for the fiscal years, 2005- 2010. For the purpose of this study the fol-lowing five public health district dental clinics were chosen: Norfolk, Virginia Beach, Hampton, Peninsula, and Western Tidewater.

Data analysis revealed that adding a new healthcare provider (a dental hygienist) to the system has a statistically significant increase in delivering oral health services at a public health district's dental clinic (p< 0.05).

 


Programs

Dental Caries in Saudi Arabia, Past, Present, and the Future

Hala A. Amer, PhD.

Professor of Community Dentistry, King AbdulAziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia and Alexandria University, Egypt

Abstract: Although caries levels have declined in the past few decades in many parts of the world, however caries still constitutes a major health problem for many developed and developing countries.

The objectives of this presentation are to review many of the caries assessment surveys conducted in the kingdom of Saudi Arabia in a chronological manner, to detect the trend of the disease, and therefore provide an insight to the future.

Materials & methods: Internet search for all articles assessing dental caries in the kingdom of Saudi Arabia was done with no limitation of time, as well as personal contact with authors of publications from Jeddah region.

Results: revealed a low to moderate level of dental caries (DMF 1.7–2.9 ) in Riyadh and in Jeddah. However a trend to increase was observed in Riyadh (DMF 4.5 ) after the year 2004,higher levels were detected among children ( 6–7 years old ) while few research data were available from adults & indicated a moderate levels of dental caries. A social and gender differences were detected.

Therefore a plan for the reduction of dental caries level in Saudi Arabia should provide organized, systematic, and regular school health programs, free of charge with a focus on prevention and integration of dental health education into the school curricula.

 


Programs

The Learning Profile of the Undergraduate Dental Students at King Abdulaziz University Faculty of Dentistry

Amal M. Sindi, PhD.

Faculty of Dentistry, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Abstract: Aim: To investigate the effect of age, gender, socioeconomic status, academic achievement, learning styles, learning approaches, and the learning environment on the reflective process.

Methods: All dental undergraduate students studying at King Abdulaziz University Faculty of Dentistry (KAUFD) agreed to participate on three occasions, between February 2008 and June 2009. Four structured questionnaires were used to determine students learning style (Felder and Soloman, http://www.ncsu.edu/felder- public/ ILSpage.html [ILS]), approach to learning and studying (Entwistle, http://www.ed.ac.uk/ etl [ALSI]), reflection (Sobral, 2005 [RLS]) and perception of their educational environment as determined by the Dundee Ready Educational Environment Method (Roff et al. 2005, [DREEM]).

Results: A total of 624 students (F=347, M=277) participated. Students learning styles: 20.7% active learners, 47.9% sensing, 68.2% visual and 18.1% sequential learners. Students adopted different approaches simul- taneously. The mean DREEM score was (112.76, SD19.54) indicating a positive view of their environment. Fifty eight percent were ample in their ability to reflect. In the final student learning model, reflection was positively associated with a deep and organised/effort approach, academic self perception and perception of learning, while a surface approach was negatively associated with reflection. Students with higher grades reflect and adopt an organised/effort approach, whilst students with lower grades had low reflective scores and adopt a surface approach.

Conclusion: KAUFD dental students are sensing and visual learners. An effective learning environment that facilitates reflection results in the development of self directed learners. Self directed students take control over their learning and employ strategies that can influence and optimize their learning and academic per- formance.

 


Programs

Contemporary Issues in Pediatric Dentistry

Omar El Meligy, PhD.

Professor of Pediatric Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, King AbdulAziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Abstract: This lecture will include information regarding a number of contemporary concepts, instruments, and therapies relevant to the current standards of oral health care for children. Evidence from recent studies, suggesting that dental caries and periodontitis may be regarded as infectious diseases that are initiated early in life, will be discussed. To assist parents in establishing the optimal opportunity for their children to remain free of the common oral diseases throughout their lifetimes, the lecture will also include information about assessing a patient's risk for oral disease, using anticipatory guidance counseling, and promoting infant oral health care program. Despite our present level of knowledge in preventing oral disease and developmental problems, practising dentists are still required to provide a lot of treatment to many young patients affected by dental caries, periodontal disease, developmental defects, or trauma. Therefore, the lecture will also provide information about newer conservative restorative concepts, pulp therapies, and certain aesthetic dental procedures designed to help the dentist resolve certain oral problems in young patients.

 


Programs

Considerable Aspects of Peri-Implant Tissues: Complications and Management

Anas Jan, MS.

Consultant in Periodontics, King Fahad Armed Forces Hospital, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Abstract: The soft and hard tissues surrounding osseointegrated dental implants show some similarities and differences to those around neutral teeth. Diabetes and smoking are two important factors affecting these tissues. In this presentation, the effect of these factors on the periodontal tissues surrounding teeth and dental implants will be discussed. The presentation will also address the role of the two major etiologic factors associated with resorption of crestal peri-implant bone tissue, namely bacterial infection and biomechanical factors associated with overloaded sites. Emphasis will be placed on diagnosis and management of implant-related conditions that are increasingly being noticed in the clinical setting, contributing to asignificant proportion of implant failures. This presentation will provide a review of recent literatures and several clinical cases related to: the concept of peri-implant tissues and causes, types and management of infection around dental implants

 


Programs

Visfatin, the Potential Marker of Periodontal Disease and its Role in the Interplay Between Periodontal and systemic diseases

Avani R. Pradeep, MDS

Professor, Head and Ph.D Guide, Department of Periodontics, Government Dental College and research Institute, Bangalore, Indi

Abstract: Gingivitis and periodontitis are primarily bacterial infections caused by a diverse group of microorganisms. Though micro-organisms are implicated as the primary etiological agent, it is the chemical mediators of inflammation that play a pivotal role in the loss of connective tissue and alveolar bone.

A goal of periodontal diagnostic procedures is to provide useful information to the clinician regarding the present periodontal disease type, location, and severity. Advances in periodontal disease diagnostic research are moving toward methods whereby periodontal risk can be identified and quantified by objective measures such as biomarkers.

Visfatin, 52 kDa adipokine, is a cytokine that is highly expressed in visceral fat and was originally isolated as a secreted factor that synergizes with IL-7 and stem cell factors to promote the growth of B cell precursors. It is secreted by activated lymphocytes, monocytes, and neutrophils. Visfatin expression is modulated in a manner similar to the cytokine response to infection and injury. Visfatin is a pro-inflammatory cytokine being implicated in the pathogenesis of several acute or chronic inflammatory conditions, such as atherosclerosis, CVD and chronic periodontitis. It may also be a contributing factor in the links between periodontal and systemic diseases.

On the basis of our current understanding the identification of one single diagnostic marker for all forms of periodontal disease seems illusionary. Nevertheless, researchers have been searching actively for unequivocal markers of periodontitis in gingival crevice fluid. The results of our recent studies on visfatin suggest that GCF and serum"avisfatin"aconcentrations increase with the severity of periodontal disease. Hence,"avisfatin"avalues may be considered as an inflammatory marker in periodontal disease in GCF and serum.

 


Programs

The Role of the RHO GTPASE Signalling Pathway in Embryonic Stem Cell Differentiation to Bone and Cartilage

Dalea M Bukhary, MSc; Agamemnon E Grigoriadis, PhD and Fraser McDonald, PhD.

Department of Craniofacial Development and Orthodontics, King's College London, UK
Reader in Bone & Cartilage Cell Biology, Department of Craniofacial Development and Orthodontics, King's College London, UK
Professor of Orthodontics in relation to Oral Biology, Department of Orthodontics, Kings College London, Dental Institute, UK.

Abstract: Regeneration of bone and cartilage tissue defects caused by disease, trauma or aging is therapeutically challenging. Embryonic Stem cells (ESCs) are pluripotent stem cells that are able to differentiate into any cell of the three germ layers and are currently the system of choice for recapitulating the early stages of development in vitro. We have used this system to study the mechanisms of ESC specification and differentiation to bone and cartilage lineages, in particular, to investigate the effect of the Rho/ROCK GTPase pathway. Previously, we and others have shown that Rho/ROCK signalling affects osteoblast and chondrocyte differentiation and we hypothesise here that this pathway might influence early ESCs to commit to these lineages.

We have developed a novel ESC differentiation system using specific recombinant factors in the absence of serum. Activation of Nodal and canonical Wnt pathways together with inhibition of BMP signaling in a step-wise fashion directed ESCs to form the appropriate mesodermal derivatives that can subsequently differentiate efficiently towards osteoblast and chondroblast lineages. Addition of the ROCK inhibitor, Y-27632, at different stages caused differential effects on bone/ cartilage formation and this was confirmed by qPCR analysis of bone/cartilage-specific genes. This suggests that the Rho GTPase pathway has a role in determining the fate of bi-potential osteochondroprogenitor cells. We are currently investigating the in vivo potential of these populations through renal capsule grafting studies. Thus, the ESC system yields expandable populations that will provide insights into the use of these cells in tissue regenerative strategies for repair and replacement.

 


Programs

The Mode of Cement Failure for Complete Crown Restorations Prepared with Different Tapers and Luted with Conventional and Adhesive Cements

Mohamed F Ayad*, PhD and Abdulhamaid A Maghrabi*, PhD.

*Faculty of Dentistry, King AbdulAziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

Abstract: Objectives. This in vitro study was to determine the relationship between the total convergence of a complete crown tooth preparation and the mode of cement failure for restorations cemented with conventional and adhesive cements.

Methods.Artificial crowns were cast using Ni-Cr-Be base metal alloy for standardized complete crown tooth preparations. Three different tapers, 5, 12 and 25-total convergence were used. The crowns in each group were subdivided into 4 subgroups of for the 4 luting cements evaluated: zinc phosphate cement (Flecks), glass ionomer cement (Ketac-Cem), Adhesive resin cements (Panavia 21) and (C&B Metabond). Failure locations of luting cements on the intaglio surface of crowns and on tooth preparations were examined with the stereomicroscope at Œ40 to categorize the failure mode. Chi-square analyses were used to examine the relationships between failure mode, cements and taper (=.05).

Results. Results showed significant dependence of failure mode upon luting cement and taper (p<.001). Regardless of the type of cement used, 12 and 25 degrees total convergence exhibited a higher percentage of failure at the crown-cement interface (92.5% and 72.5% ) and lower percentage of cohesive failure (5% and 22.5%). However, failure was primarily cohesive (40%) for 5 degree total convergence and (32.5%) at the crown-cement interface. Similarly, regardless of the total convergence, conventional cements exhibited a higher percentage of failure at the crown-cement interface (66.7% zinc phosphate cement, 86.7% glass ionomer cement) and a lower percentage cohesive failure (23.3% and 10%). However, failure for C&B Metabond specimens was cohesive(40%) for and (40%) at the crown-cement interface. Failure was primarily at crown-cement interface (70%) for Panavia 21 cement and was (16.7%) cohesive.

Conclusions. Tooth preparation taper and type of luting cement had a direct effect on the failure mode of cements used to lute complete veneer crowns made with Ni-Cr-Be base metal alloy

 


Programs

Taming of Resistant Complete Denture Patient

Mohamed Khaled A. Azzam, PhD.

Consultant in Removable Prosthodontics, National Guard Hospital-WR. Former Assistant Professor, King AbdulAziz University, Jeddah

Abstract: Complete dentures, a non-biological appliance, were and are still used to replace missing teeth and surrounding structures. Its main objectives are Aesthetics, Speech, Function and Psychological state improvement. Dentists must realize that, just as dentate patients vary in their dental treatment complexity; edentulous patients also vary in the difficulty of their treatment plan. There are two main problems facing the removable Prosthodontists being:

  1. Even denture constructed at the highest standards is still an unpleasant experience to all patients at the beginning although may improve by time. This varies from one to several years according to the patients attitude, age, gender, culture and socio-economical level.
  2. The second problem being the patient him/herself. As M. Devan said We must meet the mind of the patient before the mouth. Problems of edentulous patients are both physical and psychological. Good interview, communication and considering patients concerns of their appearance, overall attitude and treatment expectations are very important.

Methods. Artificial crowns were cast using Ni-Cr-Be base metal alloy for standardized complete In conclusion to successfully treat edentulous patients a great deal of information is required to formulate a proper diagnosis, including patient mental attitude, past and present medical and dental conditions, and extra and intra-oral examinations, in addition to the clinical experience and skill of the whole dental team.

 


Programs

Histocompatibility of Bioceramic Nanoparticulate Bioaggregate and Mineraltrioxide Aggregate

Wafaa A.M. Khalil, PhD; Hala M. Soliman, PhD; Maymouna M Badahdah, BDS

Department of Conservative Dentistry„Endodontic Division, Faculty of Dentistry, King AbdulAziz University, Jeddah, KSA
Faculty of Medicine,Zagazig, University, Zagazig, Egypt, and Faculty of Medicine, Taibah University, Al Madinah Al Monawarrah, KSA
King Fahd General Hospital, Jeddah,KSA and Dental Resident at Saudi Specialty Certificate ProgramEndodontics, Jeddah,KSA

Abstract: Aim: To investigate and compare the systemic toxic effect of DiaRoot BioAggragate (BA) which is composed of ceramic nano-particles and ProRoot MTA on liver, kidney, spleen, and lymph nodes after 7 and 30 days

Methodology: Thirty-six white albino rats were divided into three groups. Group (1) received saline as a control group; Group (2) received DiaRootBA (Diadent, Canada) ; Group(3) received ProRoot MTA (Dentsply, Tulsa Dental Specialty, USA). The Teflon tubes were filled with freshly mixed BA and MTA and implanted subcutaneously in the dorsal side of the rats. Blood samples were taken to investigate the change of kidney and liver functions on day 7 and day30. Then, these organs were sampled for histopathological examination.

Results: On day 7 a significant severe inflammatory reaction was observed in all tested organs in the experimental groups (2) & (3) (p < 0.05), compared to the control. The severity of reaction decreased over time to 30 days. However, some specimens exhibited a slight persistent inflammatory cell infiltration especially around the hepatic portal vein and areas of degeneration in lymph nodes. The kidney functions were not affected after 7 days but increased after 30 days. Liver functions increased after 7 days and decreased in the BA group after 30 days while in the MTA group a continuous increase in liver function was observed.

Conclusions: BA and MTA showed almost similar systemic reaction of initial inflammation that subsided over time without permanent injury of organs with acceptable tissue toxicity. Increased liver function in the MTA group requires further investigation.

 


Programs

Evaluation of Smear Layer Removal and Apical Extrusion of Root Canal Debris and Irrigants Using a Brush-Covered Irrigation Needle

Basel M. Abozor, MSc; Samia Elshreef, PhD; Medhat Kataya, PhD

Lecturer, Department of Endodontics, Ibn Sina National College for Medical Studies,
Professor, Department of Endodontics, Faculty of Oral and Dental Medicine, Cairo University.
Assistant professor, Department of Endodontics, Faculty of Oral and Dental Medicine, Umm AlQura University.

Abstract: A newly introduced brush covered irrigation needle was suggested to improve cleanliness of root canals from smear layer. The purposes of this in vitro study were to assess cleanliness of root canals from smear layer and to evaluate the weight of debris and irrigant volume extruded apically after irrigation by a brush-covered irrigation needle (NaviTip FX) during Endodontic instrumentation. Forty single rooted teeth were randomly divided into two groups; in group1 (G1), canals were irrigated with NaviTip FX needle and in group2 (G2), canals were irrigated with conventional needle (NaviTip) then teeth in each group were further divided into two sub-groups according to needle penetration at full and half working length. All canals were instrumented using HERO shaper system and were irrigated with 5 ml of 5.25% NaOCl and 1 ml of 17% EDTA. The extruded debris and irrigant were collected and measured then the roots were splitted longitudinally for SEM evaluation. The results showed no statistically significant differences in debris extrusion between groups (p>0.05). G2 showed statistically significantly lower mean irrigant volume and cleaner canals at middle thirds than G1 (p<0.05). In conclusion, the use of NaviTip FX was not superior to conventional irrigation needles in the assessed variables. Further development of this irrigation device is required before considering its routine use during root canal therapy.

 


Programs

The Effects of Asthma and Asthma Medications on Dental Caries and Salivary Characteristics in Children

Sumer M. Alaki, PhD; Eman A. El Ashiry, PhD; Niveen S. Bakry , PhD; Khlood K. Baghlaf,BDS; Sara M. Bagher, BDS.

Assistant Professor, Preventive Dental Sciences Department, Faculty of Dentistry, King AbdulAziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia
Assistant Professor, Preventive Dental Sciences Department, Faculty of Dentistry, King AbdulAziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabi
Associate Professor, Faculty of Dentistry, Alexandria University, Alexandria, Egypt
Demonstrator Preventive Dental Sciences Department, Faculty of Dentistry, King AbdulAziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

Abstract: Aim: to investigate the prevalence and severity of dental caries in children with a history of asthma and their salivary characteristics including flow rate, buffer capacity, and levels of Mutans Streptococci (MS) and lactobacilli. Methods: The sample was composed of 30 study cases and 30 controls with an age range between 5 and13 years. Study cases were children with a past history of asthma while controls were medically fit children. The study was conducted between the years 2010 and 2011 with patients being randomly selected through electronic filing system at the Faculty of Dentistry King AbdulAziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Parents interview questionnaires and dental examination were done. Stimulated salivary samples were collected to determine salivary flow rate, buffering capacity and salivary levels of MS and lactobacilli.

Result: No significant difference was found in the DMFT and dmft scores and CPI scores between study cases and controls. However there was a positive correlation between DMFT and dmft scores (r=0.83, p<0.000) in both groups. In asthmatic patients who took their medications 3 times a day or more, the levels of MS and lactobacilli were significantly higher (p=0.014, p=0.008 respectively) compared to other asthmatic patients. Patients with severe asthma had significantly lower salivary flow rate level than other asthmatic patients (p=0.040), while patients who were taking combination therapy of antiasthmatic drugs and corticosteroids had higher levels of lactobacilli compared to other patients using other medications (p=0.02).

Conclusions: The frequency of taking asthma medications, severity of asthma and using combination therapy can significantly alter the salivary characteristics in asthmatic children.

 


Programs

Clinical and Bacterial Evaluation of Xylitol on caries and Streptococcus Mutans Levels among Patients with Fixed Orthodontic Appliances

Reem M. Azad Allarakia, MSc; Mohammad I. Masoud, DMSc; Najlaa M. Alamoudi, DSc; Najat M. Farsi, MSc; Abdullah S. Almushayt, PhD; Douaa El Derwi , PhD

Pediatric Dentistry 3rd year Master student, King AbdulAziz University, Faculty of Dentistry, Preventive Dental Sciences Department, Pediatric Dentistry Division.
Assistant Professor, King AbdulAziz University, Faculty of Dentistry, Preventive Dental Sciences Department, Orthododontic Division.
Professor, King AbdulAziz University, Faculty of Dentistry, Preventive Dental Sciences Department, Pediatric Dentistry Division.
Professor, King AbdulAziz University, Faculty of Dentistry, Preventive Dental Sciences Department, Pediatric Dentistry Division
Assistant Professor, King AbdulAziz University, Faculty of Dentistry, Preventive Dental Sciences Department, Pediatric Dentistry Division.
Professor, King AbdulAziz University, Faculty of Dentistry, Preventive Dental Sciences Department and Cairo University, Faculty of Medicine, Public Health and Community Medicine Department.

Abstract: The Aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different xylitol delivery media including gum, and chewable tablets on reducing the levels of cariogenic bacteria in the saliva and dental plaque, level of plaque in orthodontic patients. The study also, evaluated the side effects of each medium on the orthodontic appliances in the form of number of broken brackets.

Materials and Methods: The study was a randomized control clinical trial included 41 subjects who underwent orthodontic treatment. They all received oral hygiene instructions,fluoride application and scaling before randomization. The subjects were randomly allocated into three groups. The First group received xylitol chewing gum (group A) at a dose of 6 g per day for the first 3 months. The second group (group B) received xylitol chewable tablets at a dose of 6 g per day for 3 months. The final group served as the control group and didnt receive xylitol gums or tablets. Clinical examination and the collection of plaque and saliva samples were carried out at baseline and 3 months. During the patients' regular orthodontic visits the numbers of broken brackets were counted and were used to study the side effects of the different delivery systems on the orthodontic appliances.

Results: chewable tablets consumers showed a significant reduction in the plaque level and in MS count in saliva. While chewing gum consumers showed only a statistically significant reduction of plaque level at the end of the 3 months of xylitol. Use of xylitol gum/chewable tablets did not cause any harm on the brackets and wires.

Conclusion: xylitol could be an effective preventive measure for high caries risk orthodontic patients. It is friendly with the brackets and wires as it does not cause any damage in a period of three months.

 


Programs

Assessment of Changes in Oral Health-Related Quality of Life for Special Need Children in Jeddah City

Manal S. Maashi, MSc; Abdullah S. Almushayt, PhD; Abeer M. Al-Nowaiser, PhD; Omar A. Meligy, PhD, Sultan El Mubarak, MSc

Pediatric Dentistry 3rd year Master student, King AbdulAziz University, Faculty of Dentistry, Preventive Dental Sciences Department, Pediatric Dentistry Division.
Assistant Professor, King AbdulAziz University, Faculty of Dentistry, Preventive Dental Sciences Department, Pediatric Dentistry Division.
Assistant Professor, King AbdulAziz University, Faculty of Dentistry, Preventive Dental Sciences Department, Pediatric Dentistry Division.
Professor, King AbdulAziz University, Faculty of Dentistry, Preventive Dental Sciences Department, Pediatric Dentistry Division
Professor, King AbdulAziz Medical City, Department of Dentistry, Periodontics Division, Riyadh

Abstract: Oral health care for children with disabilities is a health care area that has received scant attention. Because of limited studies that are available covering this issue in Saudi Arabia, the aim of this study was to assess changes in oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) among special need children before and 12 months after full-mouth rehabilitation (FMR) under general anesthesia (GA) in Jeddah city. The English-language questionnaire measuring OHRQoL completed by asking the parents/caregivers to determine frequency of various oral health-related impacts in quality of life (QoL) for 514 years old special need children at two governmental hospitals in Jeddah city. The questionnaire was delivered to the parents/caregivers at baseline and 12-month post-operative follow-up visits. Medical, dental history and clinical examination were correlated to the suggested treatment protocol. The follow-up response rate was 87.5% with 35 participants had completed a 12-month follow-up visit. The childrens age range was from 5 to 12 years with a mean of 7.3 to 2.4 years. More than one half of the study sample were male (63%) and belonged to the age group (5-8 years) (69%). The impact of OHRQoL was negatively reported before FMR under GA with overall scale ranged from 12 to 68 and a mean of 43.34§14.83. OHRQoL improved significantly in all aspects considered following FMR under GA with overall scale ranged from 4 to 41 and a mean of 18.86 8.54. FMR under GA proved to help in improving oral hygiene status and reducing plaque index (PI) scores of the study sample throughout the study period. Treating special need children under GA has a significant long-term effect on their OHRQoL extending up to 12 months postoperatively.

 


Programs

Periodontal and Soft Tissues Injuries in Primary Dentition among a group of Children in Jeddah City, Saudi Arabia

Hend A Al Fadhli, BDS; Najat M. Ali Farsi, MSc; Najlaa M. Alamoudi, DSc; Abdullah S. Almushayt,PhD

Pediatric Dentistry 3rdyear Master student, King AbdulAziz University, Faculty of Dentistry, Preventive Dental Sciences Department, Pediatric Dentistry Division.
Professor, King AbdulAziz University, Faculty of Dentistry, Preventive Dental Sciences Department, Pediatric Dentistry Division
Professor, King AbdulAziz University, Faculty of Dentistry, Preventive Dental Sciences Department, Pediatric Dentistry Division
Assistant Professor, King AbdulAziz University, Faculty of Dentistry, Preventive Dental Sciences Department, Pediatric Dentistry Division.

Abstract: Aim: To assess periodontal and soft tissue injuries affecting primary teeth among children up to 7 years of aged.

Methods: The study investigated 3015 records of patients seen at King AbdulAziz University, Faculty of Dentistry from the period 1999 to 2010. The child age and gender; etiology, types, location and treatment of injury were determined. Also time interval between injury and treatment was recorded.

Results: Trauma was found in 49 patients. Soft tissue injuries were reported in 15 cases. Most of soft tissue injuries were laceration injuries. The record assessment shows 89 injured teeth of which periodontal tissue injuries affected 59 teeth (66.3%).Injuries in boys (71.2 %) were significantly higher than girls (28.8 %). The majority of trauma occurred between the age of 2 and 4 years. Fall injuries were 71.2% and mostly occurred at home (15.3%). Maxillary anterior teeth were mostly affected (93.2%). The most common type of periodontal tissues injuries was subluxation (35.6 %). A delay in seeking treatment was reported in 45.8 %. The most common line of treatment was observation only (50.8%), followed by extraction (42.4%).The average follow-up period was 3 months, during which 18.9 % showed poor prognosis.

Conclusions: Periodontal tissues injuries were the most common traumatic injury. Subluxation was the predominate type. Male aged 2–4 reported the highest injuries. Review of records revealed deficient recording

Recommendation: Training of health professionals in completion of patients records is very important. Increase awareness among public is vital to minimize the consequence of trauma.

 


Programs

Hard Dental Tissues Injuries in Primary Dentition among a Group of Children in Jeddah City, Saudi Arabia

Bashaer S. Abdulhadi, BDS; Najat M. Ali Farsi, MSc; Najlaa M. Alamoudi, DSc; Abdullah Almushayt,PhD

Pediatric Dentistry 3rdyear Master student, King AbdulAziz University, Faculty of Dentistry, Preventive Dental Sciences Department, Pediatric Dentistry Division.
Professor, King AbdulAziz University, Faculty of Dentistry, Preventive Dental Sciences Department, Pediatric Dentistry Division
Professor, King AbdulAziz University, Faculty of Dentistry, Preventive Dental Sciences Department, Pediatric Dentistry Division.
Assistant Professor, King AbdulAziz University, Faculty of Dentistry, Preventive Dental Sciences Department, Pediatric Dentistry Divisio

Abstract: Aim: To investigated dental hard tissue injuries of primary dentition among children aged 1-7 years attending the dental clinics at King AbdulAziz University, faculty of dentistry from the period 1999 to 2010.

Methods: A total of 3015 records, were investigated. The child age, gender and occlusion; date, place, etiology and type of injury, treatment rendered and time interval between injury and seeking dental care were determined.

Results: Of the examined records, the study comprised 49 trauma cases representing 89 injured teeth. Hard tissue injuries represented 33.7% of the trauma cases. There was no significant difference in the prevalence between boys (53.3 %) and girls (46.7 %). The majority of trauma (50%) occurred between the age 2 and 4 years. Fall was responsible for 60% of injuries. Trauma was occurring mainly at home and school with equal distributions (10.0%). Trauma most commonly affected the maxillary anterior teeth (90.0%). Fracture enamel and dentin was seen in 40.0 %. Most injuries (66.7 %) were seen after a month from the trauma. Extraction was the treatment of choice (36.7%), followed by restorations (30.0%). The average follow-up period was 3 months, of which, 13.3% showed poor prognosis such as peri-apical infection or fistula at the site of trauma.

Conclusions: The primary dentition was mostly affected by fracture enamel and dentin, in patient between age 2 and 4 years. Most cases delayed seeking treatment for a month. This finding highlights the importance of informing the public about primary tooth injury and their consequences.

Recommendation: Training of health professionals in completion of patients records is very important. Increase awareness among public is vital to minimize the consequence of trauma.

 


Programs

Spectrophotometric Analysis of Yttria-Zirconia Ceramics using Different Ceramic Thicknesses and Substrates

Yasser M Othman, MSc; Amina Zaki, PhD; Omima Elmahallawi, PhD

Fixed Prosthodontics specialist.
Professor, Department of Fixed Prosthodontics, Faculty of Oral and Dental Medicine, Cairo University.
Professor, Department of Fixed Prosthodontics, Faculty of Oral and Dental Medicine, Cairo University

Abstract: Objectives: To analyse spectrophotometrically the effect of different ceramic thicknesses and substrates on the final color parameters of Yttria-zirconia ceramics.

Materials and methods: In an in-vitro study, twenty discs 10mm in diameter were fabricated from yttria stabilized zirconia polycrystal Y-TZP and divided according to the thickness into two groups: C1(0.5mm) and C2(0.8mm). Ten composite resin discs(S1) and ten base metal alloy discs(S2) were fabricated to serve as substrate. Y-TZP discs were cemented to the substrate discs using resin cement. The CIELAB values of the ceramic discs were measured before cementation as control group and after cementation to substrate by spectrophotometer and the color differences(E) were calculated for each combination.

Results: There were statistical significant differences between different groups and subgroups for the L* values. With C1 group, S1 and S2 showed statistically significantly higher mean (a* and b*) than standard. With C2 group, S1 showed statistically significantly lower mean (a* and b*) than standard. S2 subgroup showed statistically significantly lower mean (b*) than standard. While there was no statistically significant mean difference (a*) between S2 subgroup and standard. C1S2 showed the statistically significantly highest mean E, followed by C1S1 then C2S2 which showed lower values. C2S1 showed the statistically significantly lowest mean (E).

Conclusions: Y-TZP restoration was dependent on its thickness and the type of substrate material used underneath and had the ability to mask the substrate when the ceramic thickness is 0.8mm or more. Lightness (L*) was not affected by different (Y-TZP) thicknesses and substrates.

 


Programs

The Learning Profile of the Undergraduate Dental Students at King AbdulAziz University Faculty of Dentistry

Amal M. Sindi, PhD.

Faculty of Dentistry, King AbdulAziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

Abstract: Aim: To investigate the effect of age, gender, socioeconomic status, academic achievement, learning styles, learning approaches, and the learning environment on the reflective process.

Methods: All dental undergraduate students studying at King AbdulAziz University Faculty of Dentistry (KAUFD) agreed to participate on three occasions, between February 2008 and June 2009. Four structured questionnaires were used to determine students learning style (Felder and Soloman, http://www.ncsu.edu/felder-public/ILSpage.html [ILS]), approach to learning and studying (Entwistle, http://www.ed.ac.uk/etl [ALSI]), reflection (Sobral, 2005 [RLS]) and perception of their educational environment as determined by the Dundee Ready Educational Environment Method (Roff et al. 2005, [DREEM]).

Results: A total of 624 students (F=347, M=277) participated. Students learning styles: 20.7% active learners, 47.9% sensing, 68.2% visual and 18.1% sequential learners. Students adopted different approaches simultaneously. The mean DREEM score was (112.76, SD19.54) indicating a positive view of their environment. Fifty eight percent were ample in their ability to reflect. In the final student learning model, reflection was positively associated with a deep and organised/effort approach, academic self perception and perception of learning, while a surface approach was negatively associated with reflection. Students with higher grades reflect and adopt an organised/effort approach, whilst students with lower grades had low reflective scores and adopt a surface approach.

Conclusion: KAUFD dental students are sensing and visual learners. An effective learning environment that facilitates reflection results in the development of self directed learners. Self directed students take control over their learning and employ strategies that can influence and optimize their learning and academic performance.

 


Programs

Student Attitude Toward Clinical Skill Lab Training

Najlaa M. Alamoudi, DSC; Douaa A. El Derwi*, PhD; Eman A. El Ashiry, PhD and Heba A. AlKhodary, PhD

King AbdulAziz University, Faculty of Dentistry, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

Abstract: Clinical skill lab (CSL) training in dentistry is introduced to provide an environment in which students could receive training in a systematic way, using effective educational strategies tailored to achieve the learning outcome of the dental program. Aim: The aim of the study is to evaluate the dental student expectations and attitude toward pre-clinical skill lab training and to assess its contribution to their level of clinical performance. Subjects: 120 students at the faculty of dentistry, king Abulazziz University evaluated preclinical skill lab training and its effect on their level of clinical performance. Results: 83.9% of student stated that CSL ensure a learning opportunity for each, 62% stated that it increases student motivation. Benefits included increase student teacher interaction (79.3%) and provide an informal and safe setting. 81.3 % thought that it is better for learning basic clinical procedure. and 63% stated that it allows student to achieve an adequate level of clinical competence. 82.6% stated that demonstration for each procedure is needed before its application in CLS. Students were asked to assess 14 clinical skills that constitute the intended learning objectives of the pediatric course. They rated their sability to perform skills unsupervised as Apply rubber dam (80%), Perform cavity design for Class I (77%), and differentiate between primary and permanent dentition (76%), and to perform other skills under supervision as apply celluloid crown restoration, apply stainless steel crown restoration (73.4%), apply pit and fissure sealant (72.0%), and Perform cavity design for Class V (64.3%). Conclusion: CSL is a valid teaching method that ensures a safe environment for enhancing the essential clinical dental skills. Conventional pre-clinical skill lab training results in a significant improvement in the manual skills of dental students in their clinical settings

 


Programs

The Use of Web 2.0 Technology in Dental Education: A Systematic Review

Shoroog H. Agou*, PhD; Dana A. Alyafi, BDS; Ghalia Y. Bhadila, BDS and Shahad A. Sagaf, BDS.

Faculty of Dentistry, King AbdulAziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Abstract: Background: Web 2.0 applications are increasingly being integrated into the learning systems of various educational modalities. The interaction and sense of inclusion that is provided by theses applications encourages a higher level of reflective thought. However, available literature does not sufficiently address the degree of effectiveness of web 2.0 when applied in dental education. This lack of evidence makes many educators cast doubts when considering introducing such educational technique in their teaching. The purpose of this study was to conduct a systematic review on the extent of implementation of web 2.0 and its effectiveness.

Materials & Methods: Web 2.0 was defined as a derivative of e-learning (2), which includes blogs, wikis, podcasting, virtual worlds, chatting, instant messaging, social bookmarking, social search engines, tagging and file sharing (3). A search in Pub Med, Google Scholar, Web of Science, Science Direct and ERIC was performed using keywords that depict the above definition such as dent*, web 2.0 and education. Articles that met the inclusion criteria of being from the dental field, fit the web 2.0 definition, education related and not opinions or editorials were identified. Quality assessment of the article's methodology was performed using Medical Education Research Study Quality Instrument (MERSQI). This instrument is heavily used in the medical education research and is easy to apply. findings will be summarized using standardized format and conclusions will be formulated on the efficiency of the various web 2.0 applications in dental education.

Results: 3424 articles were located, and after exclusion by title and omitting overlaps there were 190. Sixty eight articles which fully met the inclusion criteria were assessed using MERSQI. The 2 assessors were calibrated on a sample of 10 articles.

Conclusion: Much of the literature pertaining to Web 2.0 in the dental field investigates students perception and attitude towards this teaching format. They have shown that students were satisfied with such interactivity and there was an improvement in knowledge and grades. However, difficulties in implementation and data analysis limit amount of available data when it comes to assessing its pedagogical implications.

 


Programs

Perceived Sources of Stress Among Dental Students in Saudi Arabia

Sumer S. Alaki, PhD and Tumader H. Khouja*, BDS.

Faculty of Dentistry, King AbdulAziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Abstract: Introduction: Dental students are faced with stress throughout their studies, which might have a negative effect on their performance. The aim of this study was to evaluate the perceived sources of stress among dental students at King AbdulAziz University in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia and to assess the role of gender, year of study and marital status on the stress perception.

Materials & Methods: Web 2.0 was defined as a derivative of e-learning (2), which includes blogs, wikis, podcasting, virtual worlds, chatting, instant messaging, social bookmarking, social search engines, tagging and file sharing (3). A search in Pub Med, Google Scholar, Web of Science, Science Direct and ERIC was performed using keywords that depict the above definition such as dent*, web 2.0 and education. Articles that met the inclusion criteria of being from the dental field, fit the web 2.0 definition, education related and not opinions or editorials were identified. Quality assessment of the article's methodology was performed using Medical Education Research Study Quality Instrument (MERSQI). This instrument is heavily used in the medical education research and is easy to apply. findings will be summarized using standardized format and conclusions will be formulated on the efficiency of the various web 2.0 applications in dental education.

Results: The response rate was 80.33%. Among the seven domains studied, workload had the highest mean score (3.27§0.67). Completing clinical requirements was the most stressful item for 4th (p=0.001), 5th (p=0.001) and 6th years (p=0.001). Lack of time for relaxation (p=0.001) was the first major stressor for 3rd year students, while fear of failing a course or a year (p=0.014) was the most stressful item for 2nd year students. Females had higher mean stress scores compared to males. Married students were stressed about having multiple roles (p=0.034). On the other hand single students were stressed about fear of dealing with patients who do not disclose the existence of contagious disease (p=0.007) and necessity to postpone marriage or engagement (p=0.002).

Conclusion: Workload was the most stressful domain for all years with lack of time for relaxation being the most significant stressor in this domain. Dental schools should consider developing support systems in order to help students deal with the rigors of their studies.

 


Programs

influence of Patient Age on Bacterial Invasion, Distribution, and Viability in Root Dentin: A Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy Study

Amna Y Siddiqui,*DClinDent in Endodontics; *Tina Hauman,MDS; Nick P Chandler, PhD and Geoffry R Tompkins, PhD

Faculty of Dentistry, King AbdulAziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.
Sir John Walsh Research Institute, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand.

Abstract: Aim to assess the influence of patient age on the distribution of viable bacteria in different levels of root dentin in an ex vivo model

Methodology Thirty single-rooted teeth were assigned depending on patient age to Group 1: 15- 24 years, Group 2: 25-44 years, Group 3: 45 years and over. After cementum removal and teeth decoronation, the root canals were prepared using a crown-down rotary technique. Smear layer was removed by placing the roots in an ultrasonic bath with 18% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid followed by 5.25% sodium hypochlorite. Samples were washed ultrasonically and stored in saline for one week. Roots were then inoculated with Enterococcus faecalis, incubated for ten days with medium replenishment every second day. Roots were stained with LIVE/DEAD˝o stain (Baclight Bacterial Viability Test, Invitrogen, USA), and cross-sectioned along their entire length at 1 mm intervals. Bacterial concentrations from the cervical, middle, and apical cross-sections of each root were quantified using confocal laser scanning microscopy (Zeiss LSM 510, Carl Zeiss Ltd., Germany).

Results Concentrations of viable bacteria were higher in the inner third of the dentin compared to peripherally (p<0.001). Density of bacterial penetration was significantly higher in the cervical parts of the root than in both middle and apical locations (p<0.001). Teeth from Group 3 had significantly less bacteria than either Group 1 (p=0.004) or Group 2 (p=0.02).

Conclusions the pattern of viable bacterial invasion decreased in a corono-apical direction. A decrease in the bacterial density in the tubules was observed with increase in patient age.

 


Programs

influence of Clinical Experience on the Accuracy and Consistency of Estimating Radiographic Working Length Adjustment

Osama S. Alothmani*, DClinDent in Endodontics; Nicholas P. Chandler2, PhD; Lara T. Friedlander2,MSc; Brian D. Monteith2, PhD

Faculty of Dentistry, King AbdulAziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.
Sir John Walsh Research Institute, Dunedin, New Zealand.

Abstract: Aim: To determine the influence of clinical experience on the accuracy and consistency of estimating the optimum radiographic working length for single-rooted teeth

Methodology: Forty radiographs of single-rooted teeth showing files at different lengths from the radiographic apex were selected from patient records. Radiographs were digitally scanned, arranged as PowerPoint presentations on CDs and distributed to: Group 1: 35 fourth year undergraduate students (class of 2010), Group 2: 35 fourth year undergraduate students (class of 2009), Group 3: 10 Endodontic postgraduates. Evaluators were asked to indicate the adjustment needed to achieve correct working length for each tooth. After two weeks, the same evaluators reassessed half of the images. A gold standard group of three endodontists reached a consensus for each image. Data were analyzed using the Kruskil-Wallis test to compare inter-group scores and Kappa scores were calculated to determine intra-examiner consistency.

Results: The estimations of Group 3 were the most accurate. Significant differences (p<0.05) were found between groups 3 and 1 but not between groups 3 and 2. The accuracy of Group 2 was not significantly better than Group 1. Individuals Kappa scores varied between the two assessments without a consistent pattern being identified. Intra-group consistency was maintained for all groups despite the two-week elapse between the assessments

Conclusions: The clinical experience of the assessors influenced their accuracy of estimating adjustments required to achieve appropriate radiographic working length in the single rooted teeth studied. Intra-examiner and intra-group consistencies were not influenced by clinical experience or a two-week elapse between assessments.

 


Programs

Deformation in Three Nickel-Titanium Rotary Retreatment Systems After Simulated Clinical Use: An SEM Study

Wafaa A. Khalil*1, PhD and Kalid B. AlSamadani2, Ph

Faculty of Dentistry, King AbdulAziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.
College of Dentistry, Taibah University, Almadinah Almunawwrah, Saudi Arabia.

Abstract:

Aim: To evaluate deformation and microfractures of ProTaper retreatment, D-Race, and R-Endo systems after single and multiple clinical uses to remove gutta-percha (GP) from straight canals by scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

Methodology: Root canals of ninety extracted human single rooted teeth were chemomechanically prepared and filled with laterally compacted GP and AH26 sealer. Teeth were divided after two weeks into three groups A, B and C. Group A: GP removal was completed with ProTaper universal retreatment instruments (Dentsply Tulsa, USA); Group B: D-Race (FKG, Switzerland) was used; Group C:R-Endo (Micro-Mega, France) was used. Five kits of each system were evaluated for deformation and microfractures before use and after the completion of one, two, and three canals by using SEM.

Results: All the instruments of the three tested rotary systems had at least one of defect (tip fracture, micro crack, micro fracture, pitting, fretting, unwinding, and fold fracture) after a single clinical use. These deformations increased by increasing the number of simulated clinical uses. ProTaper instruments revealed the least amount of deformations followed by D-Race and R-Endo. The mean deformation depth in the instrument tip was 2. mm for ProTaper, 2.21 mm for D-Race, and 3.06 mm for R-Endo.

Conclusions: High rate of deformation was observed for all groups with undesirable outcomes during simulated clinical use.These systems should be considered as singleuse instruments. The variation of deformation rate between the three tested systems may be due to the inherent weakness of the alloys or instrument design.

 


Programs

Evaluation of Four Materials as Barriers to Coronal Microleakage in a Novel IntraOrifice Cavity Design

Madiha M Gomaa, PhD and Motaz A Ghulman, DSc.

Faculty of Dentistry, King AbdulAziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Abstract:

Aim: To evaluate the sealing ability of Gray MTA (GMTA), White MTA (WMTA), Fusio, and Bond-1 SF as intra-orifice barriers placed in predesigned orifice cavity.

Materials and Methods: fifty-two mandibular premolars were decoronated, canals orifices widened to a size #4 Gates drills and rest of canals prepared to an apical size #25 and taper of 6%. Canals orifices were widened to a standard size #6 modified gates drill making an orifice cavity of 2mm depth and 1.5mm diameter. Teeth specimens were classified into four groups (n=10) for the experimented materials and two control subgroups (n=6). Orifice cavities of groups 1-4 were filled with GMTA, WMTA, Fusio, and Bond-1 SF respectively. Positive control samples were left without intra-orifice barrier. In the negative control, orifice cavities were filled with sticky was. Samples were submerged in 2% methylene blue dye solution and centrifuged at 30 g for 5 minutes, mounted and sectioned longitudinally. Sectioned root halves were photographed under a stereomicroscope and images were analyzed, depth of dye penetration measured in mms. Data were statistically analyzed using ANOVA test. The t-test for independent samples was done between each two materials at a confidence level of 95% (p<0.05).

Results: all orifice barriers leaked to various degrees except Bond-1SF. Fusio registered a highly significant leakage score (p<0.001). Leakage scores in descending order were: Fusio (1.549mm§0.071mm), WMTA (0.605mm§0.001mm), GMTA (0.551mm§0.08mm), and (0.03mm§0.01mm). Conclusions: Emphasizing orifice wall cleanliness might help in reducing leakage. Bond-1SF is an effective orifice bonding agent which prevented dye leakage.

 


Programs

Quality of Root Canal Treatment Performed by Undergraduate Dental Students at King AbdulAziz University

Abeer A. Mokeem Saleh, PhD; Lubna Abbas Shafie Hassan, PhD and Omar Mostafa Fahim, PhD.

King AbdulAziz University, Faculty of Dentistry, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Abstract:

Aim: To evaluate the sealing ability of Gray MTA (GMTA), White MTA (WMTA), Fusio, and Bond-1 SF as intra-orifice barriers placed in predesigned orifice cavity.

Objectives: Dental teaching strategy requires any dental school to confirm that their graduates are competent at performing good quality root canal therapy. The quality of Endodontic treatment is affected by several clinical steps; among these are instrumentation and obturation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the technical quality of root canal therapy after obturation, performed by undergraduate dental students at King AbdulAziz University (KAU).

Materials and Methods: A total of 895 periapical radiographs from records of patients who had received root canal treatments (RCT) at the Faculty of Dentistry (KAU), between the years 2008 and 2011 were evaluated. These RCTs were performed by undergraduate students in their final year. Evaluation of root canal filling was based on three variables: apical extensions, density, and taper. Iatrogenic errors were also noted. A perfect filling scored 2 for all three variables. In the absence of score 2 in one of the variable the fillings were considered satisfactory, whereas if the case gained one score 2 or none the fillings were deemed deficient. Chi-square analysis at the significance level of p<0.05 was used.

Results: The quality of root fillings performed by undergraduate dental students at KAU was classified perfect in 26% of cases, whereas 36% were considered satisfactory and 39% were deficient. Canal transportations were the most noted iatrogenic errors.

Conclusion: Good quality Endodontics are multi-factorial, but may be linked to the amount of pre-clinical and clinical teaching of Endodontics at the dental school. The quality of root fillings placed by undergraduate dental students at KAU was classified as acceptable in 61% of cases.

 


Programs

Effect of Sodium Hypochlorite Gel and Bioactive Glass Medications on Root Canal Dentin Microhardness

Abeer M. Darrag, PhD and Ahmed H. Labib, PhD

King AbdulAziz University, Faculty of Dentistry, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Abstract:

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of sodium hypochlorite gel and Bioactive Glass medications on the microhardness of the most superficial dentin layer from root canal lumen.

Methodology: The crowns of 15 freshly extracted single-rooted human premolars were removed at the cemento-enamel junction, root canals were instrumented up to size 45/0.02 K-file and the roots were bisected longitudinally to expose the entire canal extension and obtain 30 root halves. The specimens were embedded in autopolymerizing acrylic resin, leaving the root canal dentin exposed. Dentin surfaces were polished before microhardness test. Baseline microhardness values of untreated specimens were recorded using a Knoop microhardness tester at the apical, mid-root, and cervical levels of the root canal. Thereafter, the specimens were distributed in 3 equal groups according to the type of root canal medication. Root canal dentin was treated with either sodium hypochlorite gel, Bioactive Glass slurry or distilled water as negative control (groups 1, 2, 3 respectively) for 7 days. Post-treatment microhardness values were obtained as with initial ones and the percentage of changes in microhardness was calculated. Statistical comparisons between the test groups were carried out using 2-way ANOVA at 95% level of confidence.

Results: Using of Bioactive Glass as an intracanal medication significantly increased the microhardness of the most superficial root canal dentin layer compared to both control and sodium hypochlorite gel groups (p 0.05), while group 1 using sodium hypochlorite gel medication had no significant role in reducing the microhardness compared to control group (p = 0.129).

 


Programs

Prevalence of C-Shaped Canals in a Dental School Population

Reham K. Ba-Othman*, BDS; Abrar M. Qasim, BDS; Shaden S. Ba-Abdullah, BDS; Osama S. Alothmani, DClinDent in Endodontics and Amna Y. Siddiqui, DClinDent in Endodontics.

King AbdulAziz University, Faculty of Dentistry, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Abstract:

Aim: To determine the prevalence of C-shaped canals in mandibular first and second molars among patients presented at the Faculty of Dentistry, King AbdulAziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Methodology: Panoramic radiographs show high specificity and sensitivity for the detection of C-shaped canals in mandibular molars (Jung et al. 2010). Accordingly, 502 digital panoramic radiographs from patients records at the Faculty were randomly selected, after excluding images for patients younger than 14 years or with missing mandibular first and/or second molars. Patients gender and nationalities were noted. The selected images were captured using KODAK-8000 Digital Panoramic System (Carestream Health Inc, Marne Vallée Cedex, France) operating at 60-90 kV,2-15 mA and 13.9 seconds. The area of interest was digitally magnified. Three evaluators simultaneously assessed the radiographs and reached a consensus to determine the presence of C-shaped canal and its type according to criteria set by Fan et al. (2004).

Results: None of the first molars exhibited C-shaped configuration. C-shaped canals were identi- fied in 130/1004 second molars (12.95%) of 86/502 patients (17.13%) with no gender predilection. The most common configuration in tooth 37 was type I while type II & III prevailed in tooth 47. Forty-four patients (51.16%) demonstrated bilateral C-shaped canals. The same C-shape type was identified in 50% of bilateral cases. The bilateral incidence of C-shaped canals was only significant for Saudis (p=0.024).

Conclusion: C-shaped canals in mandibular second molars were not uncommon in patients attending the Faculty of Dentistry with high chance of bilateral incidence especially in Saudi patients.

 


Programs

Root ZX & iPex Electronic Apex Locators for Working Length Determination: A Comparative Study

Rayan B. Yaghmoor*, BDS; AbdulAziz M. Ghannam, BDS; Amna Y. Siddiqui, DClinDent and Osama S. Alothmani, DClinDent.

King AbdulAziz University, Faculty of Dentistry, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Abstract:

Aims: To compare the performance of Root ZX (J. Morita, Kyoto, Japan) and iPex (NSK, Tochigi, Japan) electronic apex locators in roots with centered or deviated apical foramina, and to verify the actual positions identified by the 0.5 and APEX marks of their digital displays.

Methodology: After decoronation and coronal flaring, the position of apical foramen in 75 extracted human single-rooted teeth was identified under magnification. Two reference lengths were obtained; an actual canal length, determined by inserting a size 8 K-file until its tip was leveled with the most coronal border of the apical foramen and a second length by deducting 0.5 mm from the actual length.

Roots were placed in porous blocks soaked with Ringers solution and canals were irrigated with 2 ml of 5% sodium hypochlorite. For each device, a blinded operator measured two sets of electronic lengths using size 8 K-files; one at the APEX mark and another one at the 0.5 mark.

Results: Compared to corresponding reference lengths, the mean lengths were significantly longer for Root ZX especially in roots with centered apical foramina while they were insignificantly longer for iPex regardless of the apical foramen position. For both devices, the determination of the actual canal length was more precise when the 0.5 mark was used.

Conclusions: iPex performed better than Root ZX. The precision of Root ZX varied according to the position of apical foramen. The file tip was closer to the apical foramen when the 0.5 mark was adopted reducing likelihoods of over-instrumentation.

 


Programs

A Comparison of Shaping Ability Between Reciprocation and Rotation Techniques in Simulated S-Shaped Root Canals

Khalid A. Merdad, PhD; Helal M. Sonbul, PhD; Kawther M. Bukahri*, BDS; Ghalia Y. Bhadiliah,BDS; Mashaael T. Frashoti, BDS and Weam S. Mirah, BDS

King AbdulAziz University, Faculty of Dentistry, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Abstract:

Aim: To compare the shaping ability of ProTaper, RECIPROC, and Wave onesystems; with emphasis on canal transportation & amount of canal preparation using simulated S-shaped canal. Materials and

Methods: A total of thirty resin blocks with simulated S-shaped canals were prepared according to manufacturers recommendation for each corresponding system (10 blocks in each group). Preoperative and postoperative photographs were recorded using digital camera. After photographs superimposition, measurements were carried out at three points: beginning of the curve (BC), apex of the curve (AC) and end-point (EP). Differences in the shaping ability and the amount of canal transportation were compared among the groups using one-way ANOVA. Differences giving a p-value of < 0.05 were considered statistically significant.

Results and conclusion: will be presented during the conferenc

 


Programs

Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo Related to Osteotome Sinus Floor Elevation Case Report

Feras A. Aalam*1, BDS; Haifa S. Abdulghaffar2, BDS and Yaser M. Alkhiary3, PhD.

Al-Noor Specialist Hospital, Makkah Dental Center, Makkah, Saudi Arabia
King Fahad General Hospital, Dental Center, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.
Faculty of Dentistry, King AbdulAziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Abstract:

Purpose: Osteotome sinus floor elevation (OSFE) is a technique been described by Summers in 1994. Recently benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) has been reported as an early postoperative complication following (OSFE). The BPPV usually resolved by itself within days without treatment, but it creates a huge discomfort to the patient and inconvenience to the dental care provider. This report present a case of BPPV followed by OSFE procedure and dental implant placement.

Methods: A 35-year old male presented to the clinic complaining from missing maxillary right molar, the patient was scheduled for OSFE with immediate placement of endoseous dental implant (Keystone Dental, Burlington, MA, USA)

Results: The patient suffered dizziness immediately after OSFE with immediate implant placement. The symptoms remained for 3 days; BPPV was the most appropriate diagnosis. The patient was assured and placed on Parathetamole 500mg PRN (Panadol, GlaxoSmithKline, Brentford, Middlesex, UK) and also referred to otorhinolaryngologist and has been scheduled an appointment, the symptoms disappeared spontaneously and completely on the fourth day and the patient didn't visit the otorhinolaryngologist. Two months later, the patient remained symptom free.

Conclusions: Before planning the OSFE procedure, dental care provider should screen out patients with a history of vertigo, to diminish the possibility of developing it. The dental care provider should be aware of BPPV symptoms and management. On the other hand, BPPV should be included in the patients informed consent form as a possible postoperative complication as the symptoms may be very devastating, and immediate referral to an otorhinolaryngologist is recommended.

 


Programs

Horizontal Mandibular Ridge Augmentation Using Alveolar Bone Crest as Autogenous Graft Followed by Placement of Two Dental Implant

Feras A. Aalam1, BDS; Haifa S. Abdulghaffar2, BDS and Yaser M. Alkhiary3, PhD.

Al-Noor Specialist Hospital, Makkah Dental Center, Makkah, Saudi Arabia
King Fahad General Hospital, Dental Center, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.
Faculty of Dentistry, King AbdulAziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Abstract:

Purpose: Osteotome sinus floor elevation (OSFE) is a technique been described by Summers in 1994. Recently benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) has been reported as an early postoperative complication following (OSFE). The BPPV usually resolved by itself within days without treatment, but it creates a huge discomfort to the patient and inconvenience to the dental care provider. This report present a case of BPPV followed by OSFE procedure and dental implant placement.Purpose: Osteotome sinus floor elevation (OSFE) is a technique been described by Summers in 1994. Recently benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) has been reported as an early postoperative complication following (OSFE). The BPPV usually resolved by itself within days without treatment, but it creates a huge discomfort to the patient and inconvenience to the dental care provider. This report present a case of BPPV followed by OSFE procedure and dental implant placement.

A 67 years old female presented to the implantology clinic at King AbdulAziz University, Faculty of Dentistry (KAUFD) seeking a solution for unretained mandibular complete denture. Mandibular anterior alveolar ridge augmentation was necessary to accommodate two implants to retain the mandibular overdenture.

The mandibular alveolar ridge was augmented with alveolar bone crest as an autogenous bone graft harvested by horizontal osteotomy procedure using a diamond-cutting disc (width of the mandibular alveolar crest was 1.2 mm and 7mm after grafting). Placement of two endosseous implants (Keystone Dental, Burlington, MA, USA) was done simultaneously after graft procedure. Implant supported overdenture was fabricated 3 months after the graft procedure. The augmented ridge showed sufficient bone volume clinically and radiographically (CT-scan images)

We concluded that, augmentation of narrow mandibular anterior alveolar ridge with autogenous bone graft harvested from the crest and followed simultaneously with two dental implant placement was a reliable procedure modality

 


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